Peak Testosterone Forum

General Category => Testosterone, Hormones and General Men's Health => Topic started by: croaker24 on September 16, 2015, 03:29:59 pm

Title: Celiac, Autoimmune, and the Microbiome
Post by: croaker24 on September 16, 2015, 03:29:59 pm

http://www.glutenfreeliving.com/gluten-free/celiac-disease/celiac-disease-and-autoimmune-diseases/ (http://www.glutenfreeliving.com/gluten-free/celiac-disease/celiac-disease-and-autoimmune-diseases/)

Some people have the genes for celiac, but it does not manifest until later in life....this is what my dietician thought happened to me although I did not test positive for celiac.

Fasano believes the explanation may lie in what’s known as the microbiome—the collective genome of all the microbes, such as bacteria, in and on the human body. These bacteria on the skin and in the gut, our internal environment, are important factors in the disease. Fluctuations in these microbes can affect, among other things, the gut integrity, the metabolism and the immune response. That may cause the genes—which have been there all along, not causing a problem—to be turned on.

Also --

The bacteria in the gut also seem to be playing a role in rheumatoid arthritis, notes Hopkins’ Rose, and he is studying whether the microbiome is also involved in myocarditis, an inflammation of the heart muscle often caused by an autoimmune reaction.   “We should be paying attention to the genetics of the gut bacteria, as well as the genetics of the host,” Rose says. “They may be equally or more important.”
Title: Re: Celiac, Autoimmune, and the Microbiome
Post by: PeakT on September 16, 2015, 03:39:09 pm

http://www.glutenfreeliving.com/gluten-free/celiac-disease/celiac-disease-and-autoimmune-diseases/ (http://www.glutenfreeliving.com/gluten-free/celiac-disease/celiac-disease-and-autoimmune-diseases/)

Some people have the genes for celiac, but it does not manifest until later in life....this is what my dietician thought happened to me although I did not test positive for celiac.

Fasano believes the explanation may lie in what’s known as the microbiome—the collective genome of all the microbes, such as bacteria, in and on the human body. These bacteria on the skin and in the gut, our internal environment, are important factors in the disease. Fluctuations in these microbes can affect, among other things, the gut integrity, the metabolism and the immune response. That may cause the genes—which have been there all along, not causing a problem—to be turned on.

Also --

The bacteria in the gut also seem to be playing a role in rheumatoid arthritis, notes Hopkins’ Rose, and he is studying whether the microbiome is also involved in myocarditis, an inflammation of the heart muscle often caused by an autoimmune reaction.   “We should be paying attention to the genetics of the gut bacteria, as well as the genetics of the host,” Rose says. “They may be equally or more important.”

Yeah, this is all very weird for most us.  It's kind of strange to think that we really live a very symbiotic relationship with gazillions of friendly bacteria.  Rememeber the Biosphere?  Well, we have our own little "biosphere" going on in our gut and in our mouths.

Question for you:  I have never read anything about bacteria on the skin making a difference in autoimmune responses or anything else?  Have you read anything on that?
Title: Re: Celiac, Autoimmune, and the Microbiome
Post by: croaker24 on September 16, 2015, 08:11:41 pm
I believe bacteria on the skin has more to do with acne, rosacea, eczema, dandruff, and so on.    They sometimes give antibiotic creams for these conditions.
Title: Re: Celiac, Autoimmune, and the Microbiome
Post by: PeakT on September 16, 2015, 08:53:20 pm
I believe bacteria on the skin has more to do with acne, rosacea, eczema, dandruff, and so on.    They sometimes give antibiotic creams for these conditions.

Oh absolutely on the acne front - I know that one...