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Messages - croaker24

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1
Testosterone, Hormones and General Men's Health / Re: GERD
« on: December 13, 2016, 03:13:26 pm »
I never  have had it before,
Ive had a sore throat about 3 weeks now, then last night I got woken up with acid in my mouth....so how do I stop this?
-lose weight
-stop eating hour before bed

-anything else?
lots of foods to avoid here,
http://www.foxnews.com/health/2013/09/25/acid-reflux-101-common-causes-symptoms-and-treatments.html


I'm gonna stop eating before bed and lose weight(damn, being fat  leads to problems and I'm not that fat(40ishlbs) I see people  in public who are 100lbs+  how do they deal with being fat, much less wipe their ass

a) Do NOT eat at least 3 hours before bed.
b) Try putting a few 2x4's under the head of the bed, raising it about 4 inches, so that you are sleeping at an angle.
c) Trying eating more 'alkaline' for a month, eliminating fatty/acidic trigger foods such as chocolate / nuts / oranges / tomato sauce
    ( see:  http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2011/11/07/tired-of-feeling-the-burn-low-acid-diet-may-help/?_r=0 )
d) There's some testing you can do to make sure you do have GERD - but I would hold off until you ensure lifestyle changes are not helping.
e) Take this seriously.    Your esophagus is fragile.

2
Interesting read.    Not sure how much I agree with it - essentially classifying obesity as a disease.   Genetics may be part of it - but a bigger part I think is our processed/fast food culture/industry.   However, the main thrust of this article is that what works for one person will not work for another. 

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/12/12/health/weight-loss-obesity.html?smid=tw-nythealth&smtyp=cur&_r=0

If you want to make a great discovery,Ē he tells them, figure out this: Why do some people lose 50 pounds on a diet while others on the same diet gain a few pounds?  Then he shows them data
from a study he did that found exactly that effect.  Dr. Sacksís challenge is a question at the center of obesity research today. Two people can have the same amount of excess weight, they can be
the same age, the same socioeconomic class, the same race, the same gender. And yet a treatment that works for one will do nothing for the other.

3
Testosterone, Hormones and General Men's Health / Re: healthiest diet?
« on: December 12, 2016, 08:59:58 am »
Eventually - the 'healthiest diet' will be the one that is designed according to your genetic profile,  and also,  very likely the composition of your gut bacteria.   
Long way to go on that, but for example, see this:

http://www.wsj.com/articles/test-your-genes-to-find-your-best-diet-1471887390

Because of this, and because I think most nutrition science is of very poor quality (observational studies for example) I'm increasingly tuning out the nutrition noise. 

4
http://ajcn.nutrition.org/content/early/2016/11/23/ajcn.116.142521.abstract

This is nothing more than an observational study - which is not reliable (correlation <> causation).    However, one of the authors is Wayne Campbell of Purdue,
who *seems* to have a balanced view of nutrition (advocating that Americans do not get enough veggies/fruits); but he does advocate lean, grass fed meats,
and eggs in the diet - and I suspect he has ties to the meat lobbying groups - or a bias - because of being from an agricultural state with a lot of meat production.   

Your tenure at Purdue in nutrition science is going to be short if you advocate a vegan diet!   Wayne does a lot of research on red meat and is quoted by industry groups.     
I respect him - I don't trust his conclusions.

5
Hi all.
I think I am very close to get on TRT
Test 370, free test 10? Estradiol 30, shbg 40

I would like to obtain feedback from you guys how are doing on TRT, and what is the frequency cause I think I will be put on nebido.
What are the pros and cons in your opinion. In sex, libido, gym, gyno, testicle size, fertility , body composition, etc ...
I am 37 , 20/. Bf

Very confused r8 now
Many many Thks to all

What is your reason to go on TRT?    Your total is 370 which is not horrible and probably can be raised by reading Peak's materials on "How to raise your T naturally".    I've been on TRT for
over 3 years due to having hypogonadism (total T of 127 or so) - and I'm worried about the long-term consequences for my health - like any medication - we are guinea pigs and have no idea what  will happen years down the road.     

6
We did the 24 hour cortisol saliva test, and it was fine.  He pulled DHEA-S and Prolactin (4.5 on a range of 2.0 to 18.0).  But no progesterone.  Maybe I should ask him to pull that in January when I have my labs redone?  If Progesterone or Pregnenlone can affect the cholesterol side, it may be worth once last look before we exhaust hormone imbalances as a cause?

Or, check your golf swing.   Maybe an excessive number of shanks lately so the golfing gods are messing with you.

7
"A new randomized controlled trial involving 38 men shows that a diet high in saturated fat and low in refined sugar/processed foods leads to reduced fat storage (in liver and heart), improved triglycerides, improved blood sugar/insulin sensitivity, and lower blood pressure. It basically reduced important risk factors for heart disease."

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2016/12/161202094340.htm

Maybe not ---  http://www.healthnewsreview.org/news-release-review/news-release-takes-on-conventional-wisdom-suggests-diet-high-in-saturated-fats-is-good-for-you-but-the-evidence-doesnt-support-the-claim/

A single, brief study from Norway claims to demonstrate that saturated fats are generally beneficial for most people, in contrast to much research that suggests potential heart risks are associated with higher saturated fat intake. The study of 38 men with abdominal obesity took place over a 12-week period and compared the effects of either a high carbohydrate or a high fat diet.

This study, though randomized, only measured markers of risk such as blood pressure and triglycerides (not actual heart disease) for a short period of time. Current recommendations regarding fat intake are based on actual rates of heart disease found in large groups of people followed for years.

Itís not unreasonable to raise questions about the role of saturated fat in heart disease. Researchers readily acknowledge that existing studies on the issue have important limitations. However, this release goes too far in describing the significance of this single small study, and gives no acknowledgment to evidence that cuts the other way. The release also lacks information expected of a solid account of a new nutrition study ó such as a measurable benefit, harms, and details of the dietís contents.

8
I have been an avid backpacker and trail runner for most of my adult life.   I don't know if it ever bumped up my testosterone levels, but mentally its great.   However, I always drop weight on backpacking trips.   Usually close to a pound a day.   For example, this last summer I did a solo week off trail in the Wind River Range in the Bridger Wilderness.   I dropped 5 pounds.   Carrying yourself over high passes, across boulder fields, glaciers, and so on is very strenuous and you are only eating what you are carrying with you.

It has to be good for us though because its what we are evolved to do.   

My campsite at Peak Lake:


Hey, they named a lake after me.  No, smart man to get out in all that gorgeous scenery and get away from all the urban metro crap for a few days!

Yeah I work in IT as a Senior Sys Admin, so I need that time in the wilderness to disconnect from everything.

Ha.  Same here, long-time IT guy.   

There's a small nature reserve near work and I try and get there every day during lunch to walk for about 20 minutes.    That seems to help a lot, just walking through the trees, listening to the birds/river, and absorbing some sun does a lot to calm me down.   How did you post those pictures?    I have some spectacular ones from my hiking trip a few years ago.

9
What were your triglycerides?    Are you making additional diet changes besides the oats/lean meats?

I'm doing flaxseed and steel cut oats daily + fish a few days a week.   Last time out that I measured LDL-P it was 540, as of June 2014.   I plan to re-measure in Jan to see what has
changed because my diet has gravitated towards more plant-based, with mostly fish, a little chicken or bison, but only about 4 times a week.    I only do 1 TBS of flaxseed because
that stuff can have a strong laxative effect for me.   

Good luck with this.

10
I would like to know if both the before and after testosterone tests were taken at the same time of day.

There were a bunch of other improvements too. Now all I need is a month off, a backpack, and the will to live.

http://www.outsideonline.com/2125031/what-happens-your-body-thru-hike

Interesting.    I'm an avid hiker, but no longer have the time to do as much as I would like.    I did a 60 mile hike 2 years ago, 7 days of blissful detachment from modern living.   You get up, eat,
pack, and the entire day is focused on  getting to your next destination.     No internet/cell phone/wifi - in short - no contact with the outside world while on the trail.   

Maybe his T doubled because that is how we evolved to live - up and moving most of the day outside.    There's no describing just how great I felt on a daily basis - total decompression and a
serene mind.   

11

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2016/11/161123141436.htm
http://sydney.edu.au/news-opinion/news/2016/11/24/major-finding-identifies-nitrogen-as-key-driver-for-gut-health.html

The researchers' new model suggests that while high-carbohydrate diets were the most likely to support positive interactions in the microbiome, such benefits were relative to the protein intake of the host animal.   Researchers hope the new findings will lay the foundations for more accurate computer simulations to test hundreds of different diet variants, helping to better predict which dietary combinations lead to optimal gut health.   "There are many ways to achieve a good diet, and the same diet wonít work in the same way in each person," said co-author Professor Stephen Simpson, Academic Director of the Charles Perkins Centre.

Wait!  So which a high P/C ratio or low is good for gut diversity?!  I don't think I read that in the article?

And I don't think I want to know if protein decreases gut diversity.  Gonna cry if that's the case.

That frustrated me a lot also.   Still digging around and trying to find that out.    My take is there's a balance - you do need some protein but I can't access the full study.

12

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2016/11/161123141436.htm
http://sydney.edu.au/news-opinion/news/2016/11/24/major-finding-identifies-nitrogen-as-key-driver-for-gut-health.html

The researchers' new model suggests that while high-carbohydrate diets were the most likely to support positive interactions in the microbiome, such benefits were relative to the protein intake of the host animal.   Researchers hope the new findings will lay the foundations for more accurate computer simulations to test hundreds of different diet variants, helping to better predict which dietary combinations lead to optimal gut health.   "There are many ways to achieve a good diet, and the same diet wonít work in the same way in each person," said co-author Professor Stephen Simpson, Academic Director of the Charles Perkins Centre.






13
I take it you don't think the b12 blood test is very accurate?

Nope.  I just meant that I had never read on the best way to test it.  I know zinc and magnesium testing are quite tricky and there are multiple tests out there.  Just wondering how it was handled for B12.  Nothing between the lines there...

I went ahead and did the B12 & Folate tests (at the urging of my dietician):

Folate (reference range:  ng/mL > 3.0)  my results were 8.2
B12 (reference range:  pg/mL  211-946) my results were 686

Problem is - I'm taking B12 supplements which probably screws up the testing.     But she was aware of this and suggested that Folate / B12 together would be more useful.    I've researched this to some degree and there's (as par the course) a ton of opinions.    For example, MCV.  As understand either a low/high MCV indicates different types of anemia.   My MCV is right in the middle of the range, as of the last test.

Thx!  Question for you though:  why would B12 supplementation screw up the testing?  Aren't you trying to test to see if the B12 supplementation is working, i.e. that you don't have some kind of digestive issue?

It was her thought process on the supplementation and testing - that taking B12 supplements and achieving normal B12 levels may be masking issues if you rely on B12 serum testing alone - even with an ostensibly normal test level, you could be masking a real deficiency.  Her take is if you really want to assess for B12, you need to test for B12, Folate, hemoglobin, MCV, and homocysteine to get the full picture?     

I was told to take B12 and D3 due to suspicious of celiac or gluten sensitivity by my initial celiac dietitian from 3 years ago, but the one I'm seeing now is challenging all aspects of the original diagnosis.   

14
This is the best review of the book I've seen:   http://www.skeptic.com/reading_room/the-ultimate-trade-off-why-men-die-first/     

I'm still reading the book - which is a strictly scientific summary, with some speculation, of male aging from an evolutionary context.     Hormones play a big role in the book.   
There are implications - while admitting that the robust evidence is not all there - that higher levels of T as you get older may not be a good thing, as viewed from an evolutionary lens.

So far, a few things -

The assumption that T levels decline as you age is not some universal truth.   He discusses one hunter-gather society where they start with lower levels in general but these levels
don't change much as they age - but they tend to be lean their whole life.

In Japan, they have the same general pattern initially - their T levels peak in the 20's and drop off until the 40's where they stabilize, but here in the US they continue to drop.   Not entirely sure why, but I'm betting the men in Japan stay lean as they age.   We in the US get fat.   

T suppresses immune systems.  Women have more robust immune systems at the cost of being far more prone to autoimmune diseases (estrogen).   I'm gathering that estradiol in particular plays a big role in immune system's robustness.    Does that mean for us on TRT, we might want to see lower levels of T with estradiol running toward the higher end of the range for a better balance (immune-system wise)?  Yet - he says that it not seem to be true that as our T declines as we age that we develop an increased ability to fight off infections, the decline in the ability to fight infections happens in spite of of the T levels.    So I'm not clear on that.

Having big muscles as you age is costly, the energy expenditure diverted could be better used to fight infections.    So you guys bulking up to impress the females or out of vanity might be increasing your risk for infections down the road. 

Higher levels of T appear to make men act more stupid - taking more risks.   Being the macho type is dumb in the long run.

 

15
I take it you don't think the b12 blood test is very accurate?

Nope.  I just meant that I had never read on the best way to test it.  I know zinc and magnesium testing are quite tricky and there are multiple tests out there.  Just wondering how it was handled for B12.  Nothing between the lines there...

I went ahead and did the B12 & Folate tests (at the urging of my dietician):

Folate (reference range:  ng/mL > 3.0)  my results were 8.2
B12 (reference range:  pg/mL  211-946) my results were 686

Problem is - I'm taking B12 supplements which probably screws up the testing.     But she was aware of this and suggested that Folate / B12 together would be more useful.    I've researched this to some degree and there's (as par the course) a ton of opinions.    For example, MCV.  As understand either a low/high MCV indicates different types of anemia.   My MCV is right in the middle of the range, as of the last test.   



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