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Messages - Boxcar

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1
Sleep deprivation is one of the most reliable ways to lower a man's testosterone.  So this is always worth looking at, for a guy with low testosterone.

2
Yea, that is a lot of DHEA, which can convert to estrone (a form of estrogen).

3
Do you have a range for the free testosterone?  Based on your total test and SHBG, you should have brutally low free test.  You actually have pretty good shoulder and arm development (I could never look like that with low test), although there is also genetics and your leanness helps with definition.

Have you talked to a doctor about the tumor?  That is the likely reason for your low testosterone.  Getting more calories can sometimes raise testosterone, but not when there is some other cause like this.

4
since i didn't get diagnosed with low t until i was 30, i have plenty of experience working out with hypogonadism.

i always looked at other less disciplined folks and thought what are the odds they see better gains then me?

it felt the harder i worked out, the more strength i would lose for the next workout.

i was always in better condition then the average person, with a large frame, but i could never pack muscles.

after test injections, i inflated with muscles and for the first time in my life, alot of people noticed the changes.

it also greatly increased my endurance for long distance jogging and lifting.
how long were you on trt for when you started to notice muscle increase

Not to answer for him, but I had a similar experience...  Within a few months, I had replaced maybe 10 lbs of fat with muscle.  I looked very noticeably different, without much exercise.  For those of us with low testosterone for many years, treatment is like finally finishing puberty.

5
Peak spent so much time on maintaining this site. It will take a special person or group of people to maintain it the way he did. He personally made sure every thread was acknowledged and questions answered thoroughly. I pray the site retains the quality it has but I fear it will slowly dwindle away. Fingers crossed!

Yea, I agree.  It has been nice to see things stay active.  I think we have a chance to keep things going.  There is technical and administrative work that will fall on someone.  But most of Peak's hours just went into personally responding to people.  And the regulars (new and old) are doing a good job of that (and let's not forget the good docs!).  I don't know about the other guys, but participating in this forum now feels like I am paying tribute to a good friend.

6
The triggers you are describing (sitting, urinating and defecating) are classic triggers for prostatitis or chronic pelvic pain syndrome.  Just calling it "pelvic floor disorder" is a better generic term, because you do not seem to have discomfort.  What these all have in common is a disorder of the delicate nerves and muscles of the pelvic floor.  Sometimes it is more muscle-centric (ie, a "headache of the pelvis").  In my case, it is more of a neuropathy.

The face rash is unusual.  I suspect that nerves can trigger rashes (frankly, I don't know how else you can explain it).  In my case, my pelvic pain will trigger pain in my hands and feet (almost like diabetic neuropathy, although it is definitely triggered by pain in my pelvis).  I have never heard of anyone else having pelvic pain in this way.  But that just gives you an idea of how individual symptoms can be.

The pelvic floor physiotherapy you are doing makes sense.  The therapy that some people swear by for fixing the muscles down there is called (I think) "internal trigger point therapy."  This involves the therapist sticking a finger into your rectum (I know).  I have never done this (I can barely tolerate a prostate exam) but my men's health doc (who works at one of the big clinics) says he knows men who have been helped by it.

In terms of other therapies, low dose amitriptyline (a tricyclic antidepressant) has helped with my pain.  I have no idea if that could help with the rash, etc.  Lyrica and Neurontin have also been standard therapies, because they calm overexcited nerves.  In theory, clonidine will calm the sympathetic nervous system, but I find it just helps me sleep.

Alfuzosin, which is given for BPH, may sometimes help with symptoms by relaxing the muscles around the prostate.  It is worth looking into, since it may target the specific muscles involved (it did nothing for me).

Also, I would just point out that the cold penis and retracted testicles you are describing may well be something you can live with.  I am not saying you should stop trying to fix this.  But we tend to take it personally when we feel something is "not right down there."  But I have had retracted testicles (and penis) maybe 90% of the time, for my entire life.  This predates my chronic pain (which began after a crash on my bike).  I had a circumcision when I was an older boy, just because my retracted penis made it difficult to urinate normally.  (sexually I am fine, with normal length etc, but I do look different than other guys)  What I am saying here is that this sort of thing is within the range of normal.  So don't let it get to you.

You may want to look into forums that cater specifically to these men's issues.  I can't make any recommendations right now, but there was a good one many years ago when these issues started for me.  Also, I would just recommend that you listen to your body and be careful with a couple of things -- 1) Bike riding can severely worsen this.  2) Lots of sexual activity can do so as well.  For some people, stress may also contribute to the chronic tensioning of muscles.  But lots of bike riding and sexual activity can make things much worse (and believe me, you can develop debilitating pain).

I hope all that helps some, without just scaring you more.  I know where you are coming from when you describe the stress of dealing with these issues and with doctors.

7
A lot of guys who are that low will have significant anxiety and depression.  I also had very low muscle mass.  Some guys will have sexual health issues, although that was not the case for me.  If your SHBG is on the low side, then you may be ok with lower testosterone levels (since your free testosterone will be higher than your total might indicate).  Next time, get SHBE and/or free testosterone, in addition to total testosterone.  Low levels can also effect health measures that are not obvious, such as low bone mineral density and prediebetes.

At your levels, you could go straight to injections.  But it sounds like you want to pursue more conservative options first (which given your age, makes sense).

1)  Maximize normal levels.  Exercise can help, as you know (although lifting heavy with legs and HIIT are the best methods).  Get good sleep (apnea can lower testosterone and energy, if there is any chance you have that).  Having lots of body fat will lower testosterone.  At the other end of the scale, not getting enough calories will do this also.  Carbs are good for testosterone, as is fat (saturated and monounsaturated).  Olive oil seemed to raise my testosterone levels, which was probably from the monounsaturated fat (2-4 teaspoons of extra virgin olive oil per day).  Being deficient of vitamin d or zinc can seriously lower testosterone as well.  So those are good to get tested.

If the above does not work (or does not apply), then there is a long list of health issues that can lower testosterone (check out the main site).  This includes things like thyroid problems and pituitary tumors  (Christopher Walker says he had a tumor -- fixing this is how he fixed his hormones).  Realistically, not every guy checks into every potential cause for low testosteron before beginning treatment.

2)  Low Dose Clomid.  If the above does not work or apply, low dose clomid will boost your body's natural testosterone production.  The good things about this treatment is that it is a cheap and easy pill.  It raises fertility (TRT usually lowers it).  And it does not shut down your natural hormone production.  The downside is that there can be side effects (visual floaters, mood issues or sexual).  Keeping to a super low dose can minimize this.  But some guys just can't tolerate it, or just don't see theraputic benefits (even though testosterone goes up).

3)  HCG Monotherapy.  This stimulates your body to produce more testosterone.  It requiers injecting 3x per week, although they are relatively easy.  HCG needs refrigeration and it is somwhat pricey.  Guys seem to have somewhat mixed experiences with it.

4)  TRT (alone or with HCG)  Most guys on this forum are on TRT (most inject, but gels are also an option).  Addding low dose HCG will often mitigate the issues with fertility and testicular atrophy.  TRT injections are a fairly tried-and-true therapy.  So a lot of doctors would be happy to start you off on this.  But it does shut down your natural testosterone production (not generally permanatly, but men often experience withdrawl for a period after stopping).  So the above options are best to try first, if you prefer them.  A small percentage of men (around 1%, according to my doc) will have permanant fertility issues, even after stopping TRT.  So as a young guy, if you have plants to start a family, I would consider adding HCG and possibly even do sperm banking.

So that's kind of the long story, so I hope that's not too much of an information deluge. 

8
Testosterone, Hormones and General Men's Health / Re: Cracking joints?
« on: March 13, 2018, 05:00:48 pm »
Clicking Joints? Solution Discovered in Year 2002

Had clicking joints since age 14 without knowing that's its a sign of physical deficiency. By age 38 in 2002, had already been studying Natural medicine for three years:

1- Discovered at that time in 2002 that I had a Sulfur deficiency just as the majority of people but they do not realize it. Sulfur is a macro mineral with high body requirements.
2- Started taking Mustard Sauce, off the shelf variety, because Mustard has the highest possible concentration of organic sulfur compared to any food. About 13.0 grams [ not Mg] of Molecular Sulfur per 100 grams. This is about 10X higher then the next highest source which is Pumpkin. Mustard is Gold........
3- Within two weeks of taking two to three round tablespoons Mustard Sauce per day with Lunch, all joint clicking and cracking noises stopped. Never came back.
4- Sulfur is an important building block for ligaments, Cartilage and even the Synovial fluid needs some.

When I was young, used to only eat mustard with hamburgers but never had any idea that it contained such important nutrients otherwise I would have taken it on a constant basis.

Mustard, huh?  The sulfur thing does make sense.  MSM is a common joint supplement and I believe it is just a dietary source for sulfur.  The one thing about it is that sulfur antagonizes selenium and calcium (do a google image search: "mineral antagonism wheel").  After taking MSM for several months, I was low in selenium and calcium (which was strange, since I supplemented with selenium).

9
I get where the FDA is coming from here.  There have been several high profile quality control issues with compounding pharmacies.  So it makes sense to limit compounding pharmacies to making products that are not being produced by drug manufacturers.  But the way regulations are implemented inevitably means less consumer choice.  Which is ridiculous.  We are all adults here.  If there is less quality control, then let the consumer decide whether he wants to take that chance.

Big pharma is not without issues either.  A batch of testosterone cypionate I used was recalled due to concerns about sterility (!!!).  I was informed after I had already used it.  I did not have any issues, but that's the last thing you want to hear.

I also understand why people would not want the cottonseed oil formula.  I avoid cottonseed oil in my food, but I am injecting the damn stuff in my leg.  It is not worth the hassle and expense for me to find something else.  But given an alternative, I would take it.

10
What is your testosterone/free testosterone and SHBG like on TRT?  Do you have much body fat or sleep apnea?

Exercise will raise BP, but you definitely should not be high the next day.  I dealt with slightly elevated blood pressure with TRT (although not exercise-related).  Losing weight and cleaning up my diet helped a lot (no longer on BP medication).

Needless to say, you should see a doctor about this.  You don't want to take potential cardio issues lightly.

11
Would you mind sharing which pharmacies gave you this information?

Testosterone cypionate is such a basic medication, made by dozens of companies.  I doubt it would go away completely unless there is some major change in law or regulations (which we would know about).

12
Some of the benefits of TRT are from DHT, so I would not want to block that.  Saw palmetto is nothing like finasteride, but you occasionally hear of bad experiences.

Sublingual zinc has helped with acne for me.  And to the extent that TRT gives you more muscle mass, it could increase your need for zinc.  Avoiding sugar also works for me.  There is a study showing that NAC and milk thistle can help with acne.

Also, how are your estradiol levels?  Because that can drive acne as well.
My E2 level is 29. Everything I was reading from different websites says is the dht conversion from testosterone is the leading hormone cause for acne. I know there are conflicting issues using saw palmetto while being on TRT. Just seeing what others use to reduce acne besides backing off on test dosage. Iím 99% sure mine is hormonal acne.

Ok, I see.  It might make sense to get DHT checked.  If your DHT is high, then lowering it makes more sense.  But if not, then you could have issues with lowering it, like Dragon suggests.  Your call, of course.  And don't dismiss other contributing factors... I hear what you are saying about TRT triggering acne (I got it on my shoulders too) but that doesn't mean that there are not other underlying causes.

Also, I wonder if topical DHT blockers could help?  These are typically used for hair loss, but I don't see why you could not do the same for acne.  The benefit of these is that you can have a much stronger localized effect without lowering systemic DHT by much.
I should look into topical DHT blockers. Just seeing what natural alternative I can do to rid a good majority of the acne. Any other suggestions Iím willing to try, donít want to go the prescription route yet.

I am looking into the topical stuff for killing DHT and will get back to you.  I don't know if finasteride is even given for acne.  Even if it is, I would not touch the stuff (just Google "post finasteride syndrome").

I have been prescribed retin-a for acne (which also has an anti-wrinkle effect), but it is not very effective for me.  For me, avoiding sugar and supplementing with zinc have been pretty helpful.  I have always liked salicylic acid as a good treatment that is not so harsh.  Everyone is a little different in what works and has tolerable side effects.
I just bought Zinc Picolinate 22mg. Heard itís supposed to absorb better than other Zinc products. Going to give that a try with my regular regimen with twice a day showers using Cetaphil cleaning bar and low sugar diet.

I have heard mixed opinions about Picolinate, but this is not something that has been studied in depth.  For best absorption, Chris Masterjohn suggests taking zinc on an empty stomach, at least one hour before your next meal.

13
Testosterone, Hormones and General Men's Health / Re: OGTT results
« on: March 04, 2018, 08:30:05 pm »
What did Dr. Brewer think of your results?

14
Well testosterone does tend to raise LDL and lower diabetes risk, from what I understand.

15
Some of the benefits of TRT are from DHT, so I would not want to block that.  Saw palmetto is nothing like finasteride, but you occasionally hear of bad experiences.

Sublingual zinc has helped with acne for me.  And to the extent that TRT gives you more muscle mass, it could increase your need for zinc.  Avoiding sugar also works for me.  There is a study showing that NAC and milk thistle can help with acne.

Also, how are your estradiol levels?  Because that can drive acne as well.
My E2 level is 29. Everything I was reading from different websites says is the dht conversion from testosterone is the leading hormone cause for acne. I know there are conflicting issues using saw palmetto while being on TRT. Just seeing what others use to reduce acne besides backing off on test dosage. Iím 99% sure mine is hormonal acne.

Ok, I see.  It might make sense to get DHT checked.  If your DHT is high, then lowering it makes more sense.  But if not, then you could have issues with lowering it, like Dragon suggests.  Your call, of course.  And don't dismiss other contributing factors... I hear what you are saying about TRT triggering acne (I got it on my shoulders too) but that doesn't mean that there are not other underlying causes.

Also, I wonder if topical DHT blockers could help?  These are typically used for hair loss, but I don't see why you could not do the same for acne.  The benefit of these is that you can have a much stronger localized effect without lowering systemic DHT by much.
I should look into topical DHT blockers. Just seeing what natural alternative I can do to rid a good majority of the acne. Any other suggestions Iím willing to try, donít want to go the prescription route yet.

I am looking into the topical stuff for killing DHT and will get back to you.  I don't know if finasteride is even given for acne.  Even if it is, I would not touch the stuff (just Google "post finasteride syndrome").

I have been prescribed retin-a for acne (which also has an anti-wrinkle effect), but it is not very effective for me.  For me, avoiding sugar and supplementing with zinc have been pretty helpful.  I have always liked salicylic acid as a good treatment that is not so harsh.  Everyone is a little different in what works and has tolerable side effects.

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