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Testosterone, Hormones and General Men's Health / Re: Enclomiphene report
« Last post by Gef on July 30, 2021, 10:10:29 am »
Some sources I found state DIM is an Androgen receptor antagonist. It appears to block both testosterone and estrogen and lowers the expression of androgen receptors in testicular and prostate tissue in certain conditions. Seems counter productive.

Thoughts on this Cataceous?
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Knocking off 5 kg is a good start, as is keeping it off while on vacation. We'll be watching to help you stay with it.
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First update.

I havent been able to be as active as I wanted. I'm on vacation in greece. But Ive continued dietting.  I measured my weight on a small scale here in a pharmacy. Im down to 97(213 pounds). Most of it is water weight. So I guess 2 kg is fat and muscle. Unfortunately I have no measuring tape. Im going to start with bodyweight exercises to prevent muscle loss.

Current stats
Weight:100kg(220 pounds)
Waist: unknown
Buttocks: unknown.
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This link seems to be broken.
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> Could my low testosterone be causing me not to feel confident socially?

Yes it could.

The following two experiments are based on the amount of testosterone your body produces at
night while you're sleeping.

Scenario #1:
Sleep at least 8 1/2 hours per night, every night for 3 days in a row. You're going to have a better than average level of testosterone. While you're still in the workplace, do record, in a notebook, how confident you're feeling, socially.

Scenario #2:
Sleep very little or nothing, per night, every night for 3 days in a row. You're going to have very little or no testosterone in your system. While you're still in the workplace, do record in a notebook how self-conscious you're feeling, socially.
 
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Testosterone, Hormones and General Men's Health / Re: High Cortisol and DHEA
« Last post by Cronometer on July 24, 2021, 08:41:14 pm »
> what else can I do to avoid needing cortisol-blocking medicine?

You need to remove cortisole from your body naturally.

To be more specific, you need to:
1. Lower your stress,
2. Eat a good diet,
3. Sleep well,
4. Relax more,
5. Meditate more,
6. Take up a hobby,
7. Learn to unwind,
8. Laugh and have fun,
9. Work out, exercise,
10. Avoid caffeine,
11. Turn off screens and phones before you turn in,
12. Get a girlfriend,
13. Get a pet,
14. Take fish oil, ashwaganda
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Testosterone, Hormones and General Men's Health / Re: Vitamin E + Prolactin
« Last post by Cronometer on July 24, 2021, 08:15:38 pm »
> I have heard from numerous people on this site that taking Vitamin E
> can help lower prolactin.  Is this true?

No, I don't think so.

> If you would happen to know some research or data about what doses of vitamin E
> would be SAFE to take for my hyperprolactinemia, could you let me know and/or
> send a link in the replies below (or PM me the link)?

For hyperprolactinoma I'd ask for a diagnostic test such as ultrasound.

But, out of curiousity, I wouldn't shy away from experimenting with vitamin E for a few days, weeks, or months.

I wouldn't take any advice from //en.wikipedia.org -- they've got too many FEAR messages.

However, I have faith in the book "Life Extension" by Durk Pearson and Sandy Shaw. On page 747
the authors say Kelly Freas, the artist with the arthritic hands, took 10,000 IU of vitamin E along with
20,000 IU of vitamin A, per day. And that he was on that regimen for at least 8-10 months.   

> My doctor won’t let me try Caber or Bromo because I already take Focalin for ADHD
> and with my mildly elevated hematocrit and cortisol, my doc isn't comfortable "risking any more
> cardiovascular strain".

I would start looking for a better doctor.

A) because, if I had hyperprolactinoma and low free testosteron, I would work on those conditions/disorders.

And B) because a better doctor would initiate a few highly important diagnostic tests, instead of simply
"letting you try" one of those meds.

And C) because if it was Focalin, and nothing but Focalin, that tied to my current doctor, I wouldn't
stick with that doctor -- because there are many excellent OTC supplements for ADHD.

> and with my mildly elevated hematocrit

To my profile I'd add the relevant hematocrit numbers.

I hope this helps.
 
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Testosterone, Hormones and General Men's Health / Re: Enclomiphene report
« Last post by Gef on July 22, 2021, 06:43:35 am »
The range for my previous tests including this one is 0.1-2.1 ng/ml. Other sources advise <1.0 ng/mL.  I suppose I have some room to experiment with progesterone but I have no idea how responsive I will be to it, if at all. So I wonder how much time I should give to it.

Or perhaps I will continue to alternate Clomid with enclomiphene as I still have an abundant supply of it sitting on my shelf. Clomid is something that I know I am responsive to.
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Testosterone, Hormones and General Men's Health / Re: High Cortisol and DHEA
« Last post by Cataceous on July 21, 2021, 12:04:37 pm »
Ok, so in the link I PMed you disregard the part about using DHEA supplementation to reduce cortisol. You're already using it and have high levels. It'll be interesting to see if stopping DHEA affects cortisol. However, from what I read serum cortisol measurements are quite variable, making it hard to connect causes and effects. You could still experiment with phosphatidylserine and/or ginko biloba.

My understanding is that DHEA-S acts as a reservoir for DHEA, with conversion happening in both directions. Supplementing with DHEA raises DHEA-S.
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