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Author Topic: Optimum vitamin D levels as per 25OHD test  (Read 1322 times)

sh1209

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Optimum vitamin D levels as per 25OHD test
« on: January 04, 2018, 06:09:56 am »
There’s lots of conflicting data out there regarding this, and I was hoping someone could shed some light on it. Every physician I’ve had over the years have stated anything 30-100 is fine. Mine was borderline low several years back and I started taking 4000iu of D3 daily, which keeps my levels in the mid 50s. I’ve read some articles lately stating it’s best to stay below 50, so if anyone has any insight on this, please share.

cujet

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Re: Optimum vitamin D levels as per 25OHD test
« Reply #1 on: January 04, 2018, 06:38:10 am »
While there is all sorts of Vit D information on the internet, this particular site is among the most informative: https://www.vitamindcouncil.org/

My levels are at 31, living in FL, driving a convertible, working outside regularly and taking a supplement. I also have autoimmune disease. Note there is a tie-in between low D and autoimmune.
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Re: Optimum vitamin D levels as per 25OHD test
« Reply #1 on: January 04, 2018, 06:38:10 am »


sh1209

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Re: Optimum vitamin D levels as per 25OHD test
« Reply #2 on: January 04, 2018, 07:16:14 am »
Thanks Cujet

HRT Guru

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Re: Optimum vitamin D levels as per 25OHD test
« Reply #3 on: January 04, 2018, 07:34:18 am »
There’s lots of conflicting data out there regarding this, and I was hoping someone could shed some light on it. Every physician I’ve had over the years have stated anything 30-100 is fine. Mine was borderline low several years back and I started taking 4000iu of D3 daily, which keeps my levels in the mid 50s. I’ve read some articles lately stating it’s best to stay below 50, so if anyone has any insight on this, please share.

I think you're right opinions vary, I've read what you've read and my Dr likes it top of the range. I don't know I think as long as you're not bottomed out or can be within the 50% percentile range should be fine by most all opinions.

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Re: Optimum vitamin D levels as per 25OHD test
« Reply #3 on: January 04, 2018, 07:34:18 am »


Cataceous

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Re: Optimum vitamin D levels as per 25OHD test
« Reply #4 on: January 04, 2018, 07:48:31 am »
Here's a good article on the subject: https://www.nytimes.com/2017/04/10/health/vitamin-d-deficiency-supplements.html

Quote
Labs performing these tests are reporting perfectly normal levels of vitamin D — 20 to 30 nanograms per milliliter of blood — as “insufficient.” As a consequence, millions of healthy people think they have a deficiency, and some are taking supplemental doses so high they can be dangerous, causing poor appetite, nausea and vomiting.

The bottom line is there's still not much evidence that supplementation is beneficial, especially with serum levels already above 20 ng/mL. New studies are underway that may clarify the situation.

Regardless, I'd keep levels below 50 ng/mL: http://www.peaktestosterone.com/Dangers_High_Vitamin-D.aspx
« Last Edit: January 04, 2018, 08:43:18 am by Cataceous »
I am not a medical doctor; any suggestions are meant to be discussed with your doctor.
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7-12/2018 test results: TT: 800 ng/dL, E2: 31 pg/mL LC/MS-MS, DHEA-S: 264 ug/dL (49-344)—SHBG ~30 nmol/L

sh1209

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Re: Optimum vitamin D levels as per 25OHD test
« Reply #5 on: January 04, 2018, 09:40:28 am »
Thanks Cat, good article

PeakT

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Re: Optimum vitamin D levels as per 25OHD test
« Reply #6 on: January 04, 2018, 12:00:16 pm »
Cat:

Just read Josh Mitteldorf's anti-aging book - great read btw  as he's a PhD mathematician I believe - and he said that with Vitamin K2, you can supplement much higher with Vitamin D.  He advocates that as a strategy, and I want to write him and ask for the evidence of the same. 
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https://www.amazon.com/Natural-Versus-Testosterone-Therapy-Myer/dp/1523210532/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1499116128&sr=8-1&keywords=natural+versus+testosterone+therapy
And check out my New Peak Testosterone Program: http://www.peaktestosterone.com/peak_testosterone_program.aspx
If you are on medications or have a medical condition, always check with your doctor first before making any lifestyle changes or taking new supplements.  And low testosterone is a medical condition.

Cataceous

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Re: Optimum vitamin D levels as per 25OHD test
« Reply #7 on: January 04, 2018, 06:15:41 pm »
Just read Josh Mitteldorf's anti-aging book - great read btw  as he's a PhD mathematician I believe - and he said that with Vitamin K2, you can supplement much higher with Vitamin D.  He advocates that as a strategy, and I want to write him and ask for the evidence of the same.

I'm interested in knowing what the idea is based on. In this post he advocates supplementation with both vitamin D and baby aspirin. However, the newer studies on vitamin D in the article I referenced above do not look so promising. So I'll remain skeptical unless some of the bigger ongoing studies show good results.

As an aside, what do you think about these thoughts in the blog post?

Quote
But the point that most people (and most doctors) still don’t realize is that a natural diet is useless against diseases of old age.

That’s because aging itself is “natural”. Providing a natural life style can help prevent many things from going wrong with our bodies. But aging isn’t something that goes wrong. Aging is something the body is designed to do. The body is self-destructing on a schedule. If we want to slow down aging, we can’t do that by being good to our bodies and supporting them to do their best. We’re going to have to disrupt the body’s program, to thwart the pathways of self-destruction.

The paradigm that brought us natural foods is this: Modern man lives in an environment full of stresses and toxins to which our hunter-gatherer ancestors were never exposed. We are not evolved to deal with a diet of high fructose corn syrup and GM soy and beef laden with growth hormone.

Absolutely. I avoid eating all these, and hope that you do as well. But these toxins have nothing to do with the reason we get heart disease or dementia, and they’re only weakly related to cancer risk. The reason that we get heart disease and cancer is that, after a certain age, self-destruction is programmed into our genes. Our bodies’ immune systems begin to shut down. Inflammation is dialed up and begins to attack healthy tissue in our joints, our arteries, and our brains.

The insults suffered from environmental toxins of modern life are like a drop in the ocean compared to the damage that the body suffers from its own programmed self-destruction.
I am not a medical doctor; any suggestions are meant to be discussed with your doctor.
Age: 57, Ht: 5'10", Wt: 158 lbs
Protocol: 18 mg T enanthate subQ qod, 250 IU hCG subQ qod, 70 mcg anastrozole qod, 6.25 mg DHEA orally bid
7-12/2018 test results: TT: 800 ng/dL, E2: 31 pg/mL LC/MS-MS, DHEA-S: 264 ug/dL (49-344)—SHBG ~30 nmol/L

PeakT

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Re: Optimum vitamin D levels as per 25OHD test
« Reply #8 on: January 05, 2018, 02:12:28 pm »
Just read Josh Mitteldorf's anti-aging book - great read btw  as he's a PhD mathematician I believe - and he said that with Vitamin K2, you can supplement much higher with Vitamin D.  He advocates that as a strategy, and I want to write him and ask for the evidence of the same.

I'm interested in knowing what the idea is based on. In this post he advocates supplementation with both vitamin D and baby aspirin. However, the newer studies on vitamin D in the article I referenced above do not look so promising. So I'll remain skeptical unless some of the bigger ongoing studies show good results.

As an aside, what do you think about these thoughts in the blog post?

Quote
But the point that most people (and most doctors) still don’t realize is that a natural diet is useless against diseases of old age.

That’s because aging itself is “natural”. Providing a natural life style can help prevent many things from going wrong with our bodies. But aging isn’t something that goes wrong. Aging is something the body is designed to do. The body is self-destructing on a schedule. If we want to slow down aging, we can’t do that by being good to our bodies and supporting them to do their best. We’re going to have to disrupt the body’s program, to thwart the pathways of self-destruction.

The paradigm that brought us natural foods is this: Modern man lives in an environment full of stresses and toxins to which our hunter-gatherer ancestors were never exposed. We are not evolved to deal with a diet of high fructose corn syrup and GM soy and beef laden with growth hormone.

Absolutely. I avoid eating all these, and hope that you do as well. But these toxins have nothing to do with the reason we get heart disease or dementia, and they’re only weakly related to cancer risk. The reason that we get heart disease and cancer is that, after a certain age, self-destruction is programmed into our genes. Our bodies’ immune systems begin to shut down. Inflammation is dialed up and begins to attack healthy tissue in our joints, our arteries, and our brains.

The insults suffered from environmental toxins of modern life are like a drop in the ocean compared to the damage that the body suffers from its own programmed self-destruction.

I believe he consumes low carb.  You know me:  I personally believe that the ultimate diet from a health standpoint is lower fat - not necessarily low fat - and flexitarian probably. 

Now, as far as his point on aging, he is spot on and makes a powerful case.  His book is a must read if you really want to understand aging. 

Look - think of the longest lived cultures - they are only adding 10 to 20 years of life generally - it's not a quantum leap.  He discusses at length many species - and some are fairly advanced life - that actually either a) never age or b) grow younger as they age . It clearly is in the genes and he discusses the evidence for clusters of genes governing things as well.
THE MOST COMPREHENSIVE BOOK ON TRT/TESTOSTERONE:
https://www.amazon.com/Natural-Versus-Testosterone-Therapy-Myer/dp/1523210532/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1499116128&sr=8-1&keywords=natural+versus+testosterone+therapy
And check out my New Peak Testosterone Program: http://www.peaktestosterone.com/peak_testosterone_program.aspx
If you are on medications or have a medical condition, always check with your doctor first before making any lifestyle changes or taking new supplements.  And low testosterone is a medical condition.

Boxcar

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Re: Optimum vitamin D levels as per 25OHD test
« Reply #9 on: January 05, 2018, 11:25:46 pm »
For most people, 30-50 ng/ml is probably good.  If you have a specific reason to go higher, the Vitamin D Council has useful information supporting that line of thought.  Personally, I find that higher levels, around 60, help me to avoid the common cold.

Chris Masterjohn has written against the "naked ape" theory (that we evolved to live outside, exposed to lots of sun, getting tons of vitamin D) and has pointed out that traditional diets are much higher in Vitamin A.  A lot of the Vitamin D boosters think people get too much Vitamin A.  So that's another source of disagreement (Vitamins A and D work together but are also mutually antagonistic.)

Since I get more Vitamin D, I figure it is more important for me to get the various co-factors (like the K2, mentioned above):  https://www.vitamindcouncil.org/about-vitamin-d/vitamin-d-and-other-vitamins-and-minerals/

Dr. Cannell, who runs the Vitami D Council, has put his name on a Purity Products "Advanced D" formula, which has 5,000 IU's of vitamin D, with rather small amounts of the different co-factors (it's on Amazon).  It is a bit pricey ($30 for a month's supply), but give you an idea of what he recommends for most people (even with the annoying proprietary blend part).
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Re: Optimum vitamin D levels as per 25OHD test
« Reply #9 on: January 05, 2018, 11:25:46 pm »