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Author Topic: How to raise cortisol?  (Read 7725 times)

Simeoni

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Re: How to raise cortisol?
« Reply #15 on: February 28, 2018, 09:40:59 am »
I have also been suffering with low HPA-Axis activity in the past so I want to offer my own experiences.

I know that doctor Mariano has used low dose SSRI to treat the hypoactivity of the HPA-axis. At least he has done this in the past. Im not sure what is he's stance today.

Here is an excellent write up on how low dose SSRI might help with low cortisol:

http://corpus-scientia.com/forum/index.php?/topic/161-ssris-inhibit-cortisol-negative-feedback-in-humans/

I have tried this route myself and I do feel that it works. For me the most important thing was to keep the dose low enough so that you avoid the unwanted side effects.

I was using 2,5mg of escitalopram for over a year and at some point I just felt that I did not need it anymore. I did a slow taper and noticed that my cortisol stayed in good range even without the SSRI. Other thing that made me want to stop it  was the emotional numbing that SSRI's often cause.

Other things that I have tried are nicotine patches which improve the activity of the HPA-axis by increasing the release of ACTH from the pituary gland. For me this route is more of an first aid than a long term treatment option. But I do feel that it works. The idea is to use the patches is small portions. For example if you have a patch which has 24mg of nicotine - released in a period of 24 hours - you can cut the patch in quarters and take one quarter a day.

At the moment nicotine patches are more of an nootropic for me than a way to increase cortisol.

Other things that have been a big factor for me are:

1. Sleep

- If I dont sleep enough it will eventually lead to a lowered cortisol output. So good sleep hygiene is a must for me

2. Keeping my testosterone dose low enough

- If I go too much past the  1000 ng/dl mark of total testosterone, that will eventually lead to low cortisol also. Keeping the dose low enough and using a EOD injection protocol has worked great.

3. Using HCG

There are anecdotals where people have reported that using hcg with test injections has improved their cortisol levels. I cannot say for certain that this has been the case for me.

4. Thyroid hormones

if you are hypo that can  eventually lead to low cortisol levels. So having a healthy levels of thyroid hormones may increase ACTH output. Here's one study that showed just that: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2553572

Now I have also tried pregnenolone in the past but I cant say - without labs - that it helped with low cortisol. I do think it improved my sleep a bit.
« Last Edit: February 28, 2018, 09:44:23 am by Simeoni »

charliebizz

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Re: How to raise cortisol?
« Reply #16 on: February 28, 2018, 05:51:06 pm »
I have also been suffering with low HPA-Axis activity in the past so I want to offer my own experiences.

I know that doctor Mariano has used low dose SSRI to treat the hypoactivity of the HPA-axis. At least he has done this in the past. Im not sure what is he's stance today.

Here is an excellent write up on how low dose SSRI might help with low cortisol:

http://corpus-scientia.com/forum/index.php?/topic/161-ssris-inhibit-cortisol-negative-feedback-in-humans/

I have tried this route myself and I do feel that it works. For me the most important thing was to keep the dose low enough so that you avoid the unwanted side effects.

I was using 2,5mg of escitalopram for over a year and at some point I just felt that I did not need it anymore. I did a slow taper and noticed that my cortisol stayed in good range even without the SSRI. Other thing that made me want to stop it  was the emotional numbing that SSRI's often cause.

Other things that I have tried are nicotine patches which improve the activity of the HPA-axis by increasing the release of ACTH from the pituary gland. For me this route is more of an first aid than a long term treatment option. But I do feel that it works. The idea is to use the patches is small portions. For example if you have a patch which has 24mg of nicotine - released in a period of 24 hours - you can cut the patch in quarters and take one quarter a day.

At the moment nicotine patches are more of an nootropic for me than a way to increase cortisol.

Other things that have been a big factor for me are:

1. Sleep

- If I dont sleep enough it will eventually lead to a lowered cortisol output. So good sleep hygiene is a must for me

2. Keeping my testosterone dose low enough

- If I go too much past the  1000 ng/dl mark of total testosterone, that will eventually lead to low cortisol also. Keeping the dose low enough and using a EOD injection protocol has worked great.

3. Using HCG

There are anecdotals where people have reported that using hcg with test injections has improved their cortisol levels. I cannot say for certain that this has been the case for me.

4. Thyroid hormones

if you are hypo that can  eventually lead to low cortisol levels. So having a healthy levels of thyroid hormones may increase ACTH output. Here's one study that showed just that: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2553572

Now I have also tried pregnenolone in the past but I cant say - without labs - that it helped with low cortisol. I do think it improved my sleep a bit.
great post. The internet is full of fear mongering with ssri use. And I understand to some degree but I feel itís dose dependent. I didnít have the emotional numbing sides at all but everyone is different. I would like to get off at some point also just because I donít want to be on any medications.

Even with ssri I canít tolerate trt. I donít know if itís anything to do with cortisol because on ssri my cort went back to normal on trt. Trt gives me anxiety and hcg +trt is next level anxiety. Iím only on the ssri for cortisol reasons as I also am a big reader of dr Marianoís work. 

At 2.5 mg lexapro I wouldnít be to concerned with sides and being able to get off. People arenít realistic when they get off a medication. If it makes you feel good and you stop taking it you most likely will go back to how you were before and then lots of people complain that itís withdrawl and such.  Itís like saying trt is bad because itís hard to get off.  If it helps you going off is gonna suck because you go back to how you felt before and what lead you to trt in first place.

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Re: How to raise cortisol?
« Reply #16 on: February 28, 2018, 05:51:06 pm »


ilo073

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Re: How to raise cortisol?
« Reply #17 on: February 28, 2018, 06:24:27 pm »
I have also been suffering with low HPA-Axis activity in the past so I want to offer my own experiences.

I know that doctor Mariano has used low dose SSRI to treat the hypoactivity of the HPA-axis. At least he has done this in the past. Im not sure what is he's stance today.

Here is an excellent write up on how low dose SSRI might help with low cortisol:

http://corpus-scientia.com/forum/index.php?/topic/161-ssris-inhibit-cortisol-negative-feedback-in-humans/

I have tried this route myself and I do feel that it works. For me the most important thing was to keep the dose low enough so that you avoid the unwanted side effects.

I was using 2,5mg of escitalopram for over a year and at some point I just felt that I did not need it anymore. I did a slow taper and noticed that my cortisol stayed in good range even without the SSRI. Other thing that made me want to stop it  was the emotional numbing that SSRI's often cause.

Other things that I have tried are nicotine patches which improve the activity of the HPA-axis by increasing the release of ACTH from the pituary gland. For me this route is more of an first aid than a long term treatment option. But I do feel that it works. The idea is to use the patches is small portions. For example if you have a patch which has 24mg of nicotine - released in a period of 24 hours - you can cut the patch in quarters and take one quarter a day.

At the moment nicotine patches are more of an nootropic for me than a way to increase cortisol.

Other things that have been a big factor for me are:

1. Sleep

- If I dont sleep enough it will eventually lead to a lowered cortisol output. So good sleep hygiene is a must for me

2. Keeping my testosterone dose low enough

- If I go too much past the  1000 ng/dl mark of total testosterone, that will eventually lead to low cortisol also. Keeping the dose low enough and using a EOD injection protocol has worked great.

3. Using HCG

There are anecdotals where people have reported that using hcg with test injections has improved their cortisol levels. I cannot say for certain that this has been the case for me.

4. Thyroid hormones

if you are hypo that can  eventually lead to low cortisol levels. So having a healthy levels of thyroid hormones may increase ACTH output. Here's one study that showed just that: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2553572

Now I have also tried pregnenolone in the past but I cant say - without labs - that it helped with low cortisol. I do think it improved my sleep a bit.



Thank you for such a great in-depth response!

What would you think if a person's TRT dosage puts them at around 1200 for a day or so and by the end of the week they are around 500-600, is that too much and will cause cortisol suppression?

How long does it take to notice they effects of the low dose SSri? Did you experience any side effects at the beginning of the SSri treatment?

Would you say Hcg is a must if on TRT?

With your current knowledge what would you say is a good morning serum cortisol level?



charliebizz

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Re: How to raise cortisol?
« Reply #18 on: February 28, 2018, 07:49:31 pm »
I have also been suffering with low HPA-Axis activity in the past so I want to offer my own experiences.

I know that doctor Mariano has used low dose SSRI to treat the hypoactivity of the HPA-axis. At least he has done this in the past. Im not sure what is he's stance today.

Here is an excellent write up on how low dose SSRI might help with low cortisol:

http://corpus-scientia.com/forum/index.php?/topic/161-ssris-inhibit-cortisol-negative-feedback-in-humans/

I have tried this route myself and I do feel that it works. For me the most important thing was to keep the dose low enough so that you avoid the unwanted side effects.

I was using 2,5mg of escitalopram for over a year and at some point I just felt that I did not need it anymore. I did a slow taper and noticed that my cortisol stayed in good range even without the SSRI. Other thing that made me want to stop it  was the emotional numbing that SSRI's often cause.

Other things that I have tried are nicotine patches which improve the activity of the HPA-axis by increasing the release of ACTH from the pituary gland. For me this route is more of an first aid than a long term treatment option. But I do feel that it works. The idea is to use the patches is small portions. For example if you have a patch which has 24mg of nicotine - released in a period of 24 hours - you can cut the patch in quarters and take one quarter a day.

At the moment nicotine patches are more of an nootropic for me than a way to increase cortisol.

Other things that have been a big factor for me are:

1. Sleep

- If I dont sleep enough it will eventually lead to a lowered cortisol output. So good sleep hygiene is a must for me

2. Keeping my testosterone dose low enough

- If I go too much past the  1000 ng/dl mark of total testosterone, that will eventually lead to low cortisol also. Keeping the dose low enough and using a EOD injection protocol has worked great.

3. Using HCG

There are anecdotals where people have reported that using hcg with test injections has improved their cortisol levels. I cannot say for certain that this has been the case for me.

4. Thyroid hormones

if you are hypo that can  eventually lead to low cortisol levels. So having a healthy levels of thyroid hormones may increase ACTH output. Here's one study that showed just that: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2553572

Now I have also tried pregnenolone in the past but I cant say - without labs - that it helped with low cortisol. I do think it improved my sleep a bit.



Thank you for such a great in-depth response!

What would you think if a person's TRT dosage puts them at around 1200 for a day or so and by the end of the week they are around 500-600, is that too much and will cause cortisol suppression?

How long does it take to notice they effects of the low dose SSri? Did you experience any side effects at the beginning of the SSri treatment?

Would you say Hcg is a must if on TRT?

With your current knowledge what would you say is a good morning serum cortisol level?
for me my only side effect from ssri was 2nd day of taking it I had intense vertigo for about 2 hours. I never miss work I mean never. I live on Long Island and had to commute to nyc that morning about 30 mile drive. I had to turn around and call in. Then I had one minor spell when I upped it to 5mg just to see. But since then I can play with the dose and even come off and on and no more vertigo.

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Re: How to raise cortisol?
« Reply #18 on: February 28, 2018, 07:49:31 pm »


ilo073

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Re: How to raise cortisol?
« Reply #19 on: February 28, 2018, 07:58:30 pm »
I have also been suffering with low HPA-Axis activity in the past so I want to offer my own experiences.

I know that doctor Mariano has used low dose SSRI to treat the hypoactivity of the HPA-axis. At least he has done this in the past. Im not sure what is he's stance today.

Here is an excellent write up on how low dose SSRI might help with low cortisol:

http://corpus-scientia.com/forum/index.php?/topic/161-ssris-inhibit-cortisol-negative-feedback-in-humans/


Thanks for your response!

Are you still on the 2.5mg?

Why did you begin taking it?

What do you like about it?




I have tried this route myself and I do feel that it works. For me the most important thing was to keep the dose low enough so that you avoid the unwanted side effects.

I was using 2,5mg of escitalopram for over a year and at some point I just felt that I did not need it anymore. I did a slow taper and noticed that my cortisol stayed in good range even without the SSRI. Other thing that made me want to stop it  was the emotional numbing that SSRI's often cause.

Other things that I have tried are nicotine patches which improve the activity of the HPA-axis by increasing the release of ACTH from the pituary gland. For me this route is more of an first aid than a long term treatment option. But I do feel that it works. The idea is to use the patches is small portions. For example if you have a patch which has 24mg of nicotine - released in a period of 24 hours - you can cut the patch in quarters and take one quarter a day.

At the moment nicotine patches are more of an nootropic for me than a way to increase cortisol.

Other things that have been a big factor for me are:

1. Sleep

- If I dont sleep enough it will eventually lead to a lowered cortisol output. So good sleep hygiene is a must for me

2. Keeping my testosterone dose low enough

- If I go too much past the  1000 ng/dl mark of total testosterone, that will eventually lead to low cortisol also. Keeping the dose low enough and using a EOD injection protocol has worked great.

3. Using HCG

There are anecdotals where people have reported that using hcg with test injections has improved their cortisol levels. I cannot say for certain that this has been the case for me.

4. Thyroid hormones

if you are hypo that can  eventually lead to low cortisol levels. So having a healthy levels of thyroid hormones may increase ACTH output. Here's one study that showed just that: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2553572

Now I have also tried pregnenolone in the past but I cant say - without labs - that it helped with low cortisol. I do think it improved my sleep a bit.



Thank you for such a great in-depth response!

What would you think if a person's TRT dosage puts them at around 1200 for a day or so and by the end of the week they are around 500-600, is that too much and will cause cortisol suppression?

How long does it take to notice they effects of the low dose SSri? Did you experience any side effects at the beginning of the SSri treatment?

Would you say Hcg is a must if on TRT?

With your current knowledge what would you say is a good morning serum cortisol level?
for me my only side effect from ssri was 2nd day of taking it I had intense vertigo for about 2 hours. I never miss work I mean never. I live on Long Island and had to commute to nyc that morning about 30 mile drive. I had to turn around and call in. Then I had one minor spell when I upped it to 5mg just to see. But since then I can play with the dose and even come off and on and no more vertigo.

Simeoni

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Re: How to raise cortisol?
« Reply #20 on: March 01, 2018, 09:09:55 am »
Well I can only say that for me a peak of 1200 ng/dl is too much. Now im sure there are many who do not have  a problem with this - meaning they dont get too much cortisol suppression.

Are you able to try more frequent injection protocol - like every other day? That could balance both ends of the scale so you dont get too much cortisol supression.

Regarding the increase in ACTH - and thus cortisol -  I think that the effects should come about pretty fast. For me I saw an noticeable increase in my cortisol levels in a matter of two weeks.

During the first weeks the side effects were also stronger and they eventually lessened as the treatment continued. There seems to be many who quit this treatment during the first weeks. So if you decide to try this route I suggest you stay on the treatment for at least 6-8 weeks.

For me the use of HCG is not a must but it does have enough benefits to take it regularly.

Regarding morning a healthy morning cortisol levels here is a quote from dr Mariano:

"A person at rest who is un-stressed (e.g. hasn't lifted weights the day before) generally will have a morning cortisol level of between 17-20 ug/dL. If stressed, the cortisol should be higher. This means the person has mounted an adaptive response to the stress to stay healthy and functional. For example, if a person lifts heavy weights the day before, the stress of this may raise the morning cortisol to around 30 ug/dL. This may be "elevated". But it is a normal healthy state. Thus interpreting cortisol also means taking into account the stresses a person is experiencing.

If cortisol becomes substantially lower than 17 ug/dL, then that person is failing to adapt to stress. And past a certain level, that person will become frankly ill. Examples of this state includes posttraumatic stress disorder. Addison's disease is a condition where one is unable to make cortisol due to damage to the adrenal glands. In PTSD, the problem is not the adrenal glands. The problem is that the brain is unable to produce sufficient ACTH in response to stress (norepinephrine signaling). This results in insufficient cortisol to respond to the stress to keep a person healthy and functional.

The failure to produce sufficient Cortisol means one is unable to reduce norepinephrine signaling in response to stress - Cortisol's most important function. One cannot immediately calm oneself down in response to stress. The other adrenal hormones are released along with Cortisol. This means they too would be at deficit. Progesterone and Testosterone for example are calming to the nervous system. Mood then becomes unstable as norepinephrine stimulates the negative subcortical emotional systems of FEAR, RAGE, and PANIC-GRIEF. In children, you see them having tantrums. In adults, you may get anger outbursts or panic attacks, among its many manifestations. Failure to produce sufficient Cortisol also means inflammatory signaling is not controlled. As inflammatory signaling goes up, energy production is shut down, depressive syndromes occur, etc.""

Now my cortisol tests have mainly been in the nmol/l range and I see 450-550 nmol/l as a healthy level for me. So I would say that having morning cortisol at the upper end - not over the range - is an indicator of a healthy HPA-axis.

I have also been suffering with low HPA-Axis activity in the past so I want to offer my own experiences.

I know that doctor Mariano has used low dose SSRI to treat the hypoactivity of the HPA-axis. At least he has done this in the past. Im not sure what is he's stance today.

Here is an excellent write up on how low dose SSRI might help with low cortisol:

http://corpus-scientia.com/forum/index.php?/topic/161-ssris-inhibit-cortisol-negative-feedback-in-humans/

I have tried this route myself and I do feel that it works. For me the most important thing was to keep the dose low enough so that you avoid the unwanted side effects.

I was using 2,5mg of escitalopram for over a year and at some point I just felt that I did not need it anymore. I did a slow taper and noticed that my cortisol stayed in good range even without the SSRI. Other thing that made me want to stop it  was the emotional numbing that SSRI's often cause.

Other things that I have tried are nicotine patches which improve the activity of the HPA-axis by increasing the release of ACTH from the pituary gland. For me this route is more of an first aid than a long term treatment option. But I do feel that it works. The idea is to use the patches is small portions. For example if you have a patch which has 24mg of nicotine - released in a period of 24 hours - you can cut the patch in quarters and take one quarter a day.

At the moment nicotine patches are more of an nootropic for me than a way to increase cortisol.

Other things that have been a big factor for me are:

1. Sleep

- If I dont sleep enough it will eventually lead to a lowered cortisol output. So good sleep hygiene is a must for me

2. Keeping my testosterone dose low enough

- If I go too much past the  1000 ng/dl mark of total testosterone, that will eventually lead to low cortisol also. Keeping the dose low enough and using a EOD injection protocol has worked great.

3. Using HCG

There are anecdotals where people have reported that using hcg with test injections has improved their cortisol levels. I cannot say for certain that this has been the case for me.

4. Thyroid hormones

if you are hypo that can  eventually lead to low cortisol levels. So having a healthy levels of thyroid hormones may increase ACTH output. Here's one study that showed just that: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2553572

Now I have also tried pregnenolone in the past but I cant say - without labs - that it helped with low cortisol. I do think it improved my sleep a bit.



Thank you for such a great in-depth response!

What would you think if a person's TRT dosage puts them at around 1200 for a day or so and by the end of the week they are around 500-600, is that too much and will cause cortisol suppression?

How long does it take to notice they effects of the low dose SSri? Did you experience any side effects at the beginning of the SSri treatment?

Would you say Hcg is a must if on TRT?

With your current knowledge what would you say is a good morning serum cortisol level?

charliebizz

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Re: How to raise cortisol?
« Reply #21 on: March 01, 2018, 04:45:08 pm »
Well I can only say that for me a peak of 1200 ng/dl is too much. Now im sure there are many who do not have  a problem with this - meaning they dont get too much cortisol suppression.

Are you able to try more frequent injection protocol - like every other day? That could balance both ends of the scale so you dont get too much cortisol supression.

Regarding the increase in ACTH - and thus cortisol -  I think that the effects should come about pretty fast. For me I saw an noticeable increase in my cortisol levels in a matter of two weeks.

During the first weeks the side effects were also stronger and they eventually lessened as the treatment continued. There seems to be many who quit this treatment during the first weeks. So if you decide to try this route I suggest you stay on the treatment for at least 6-8 weeks.

For me the use of HCG is not a must but it does have enough benefits to take it regularly.

Regarding morning a healthy morning cortisol levels here is a quote from dr Mariano:

"A person at rest who is un-stressed (e.g. hasn't lifted weights the day before) generally will have a morning cortisol level of between 17-20 ug/dL. If stressed, the cortisol should be higher. This means the person has mounted an adaptive response to the stress to stay healthy and functional. For example, if a person lifts heavy weights the day before, the stress of this may raise the morning cortisol to around 30 ug/dL. This may be "elevated". But it is a normal healthy state. Thus interpreting cortisol also means taking into account the stresses a person is experiencing.

If cortisol becomes substantially lower than 17 ug/dL, then that person is failing to adapt to stress. And past a certain level, that person will become frankly ill. Examples of this state includes posttraumatic stress disorder. Addison's disease is a condition where one is unable to make cortisol due to damage to the adrenal glands. In PTSD, the problem is not the adrenal glands. The problem is that the brain is unable to produce sufficient ACTH in response to stress (norepinephrine signaling). This results in insufficient cortisol to respond to the stress to keep a person healthy and functional.

The failure to produce sufficient Cortisol means one is unable to reduce norepinephrine signaling in response to stress - Cortisol's most important function. One cannot immediately calm oneself down in response to stress. The other adrenal hormones are released along with Cortisol. This means they too would be at deficit. Progesterone and Testosterone for example are calming to the nervous system. Mood then becomes unstable as norepinephrine stimulates the negative subcortical emotional systems of FEAR, RAGE, and PANIC-GRIEF. In children, you see them having tantrums. In adults, you may get anger outbursts or panic attacks, among its many manifestations. Failure to produce sufficient Cortisol also means inflammatory signaling is not controlled. As inflammatory signaling goes up, energy production is shut down, depressive syndromes occur, etc.""

Now my cortisol tests have mainly been in the nmol/l range and I see 450-550 nmol/l as a healthy level for me. So I would say that having morning cortisol at the upper end - not over the range - is an indicator of a healthy HPA-axis.

I have also been suffering with low HPA-Axis activity in the past so I want to offer my own experiences.

I know that doctor Mariano has used low dose SSRI to treat the hypoactivity of the HPA-axis. At least he has done this in the past. Im not sure what is he's stance today.

Here is an excellent write up on how low dose SSRI might help with low cortisol:

http://corpus-scientia.com/forum/index.php?/topic/161-ssris-inhibit-cortisol-negative-feedback-in-humans/

I have tried this route myself and I do feel that it works. For me the most important thing was to keep the dose low enough so that you avoid the unwanted side effects.

I was using 2,5mg of escitalopram for over a year and at some point I just felt that I did not need it anymore. I did a slow taper and noticed that my cortisol stayed in good range even without the SSRI. Other thing that made me want to stop it  was the emotional numbing that SSRI's often cause.

Other things that I have tried are nicotine patches which improve the activity of the HPA-axis by increasing the release of ACTH from the pituary gland. For me this route is more of an first aid than a long term treatment option. But I do feel that it works. The idea is to use the patches is small portions. For example if you have a patch which has 24mg of nicotine - released in a period of 24 hours - you can cut the patch in quarters and take one quarter a day.

At the moment nicotine patches are more of an nootropic for me than a way to increase cortisol.

Other things that have been a big factor for me are:

1. Sleep

- If I dont sleep enough it will eventually lead to a lowered cortisol output. So good sleep hygiene is a must for me

2. Keeping my testosterone dose low enough

- If I go too much past the  1000 ng/dl mark of total testosterone, that will eventually lead to low cortisol also. Keeping the dose low enough and using a EOD injection protocol has worked great.

3. Using HCG

There are anecdotals where people have reported that using hcg with test injections has improved their cortisol levels. I cannot say for certain that this has been the case for me.

4. Thyroid hormones

if you are hypo that can  eventually lead to low cortisol levels. So having a healthy levels of thyroid hormones may increase ACTH output. Here's one study that showed just that: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2553572

Now I have also tried pregnenolone in the past but I cant say - without labs - that it helped with low cortisol. I do think it improved my sleep a bit.



Thank you for such a great in-depth response!

What would you think if a person's TRT dosage puts them at around 1200 for a day or so and by the end of the week they are around 500-600, is that too much and will cause cortisol suppression?

How long does it take to notice they effects of the low dose SSri? Did you experience any side effects at the beginning of the SSri treatment?

Would you say Hcg is a must if on TRT?

With your current knowledge what would you say is a good morning serum cortisol level?
great post. I love dr Marianoís work.

cujet

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Re: How to raise cortisol?
« Reply #22 on: March 03, 2018, 01:05:53 pm »
I use a compounded T cream instead of injection. Like so many others, my cortisol is very low.

I "think" that mid-morning and daytime cortisol is higher if I use the T cream before bed instead of first thing in the morning. I certainly feel different when I do this, and have more energy in the day.
58 years old
Autoimmune Hashimoto's, near zero natural T production
Cause: severe mononucleosis in my early 30's
Weight 235 and climbing despite eating far less
Height 5' 10"
180mg NPthyroid (natural desiccated pigs thyroid)
Labs (Oct 2017) , my T=730, TSH 0.03, T3+T4 mid-range normal.
Prednisone 10mg/day (no ACTH, dangerously low cortisol)
 
10% compounded creme. T=725, which feels just right.

charliebizz

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Re: How to raise cortisol?
« Reply #23 on: March 03, 2018, 09:26:19 pm »
I use a compounded T cream instead of injection. Like so many others, my cortisol is very low.

I "think" that mid-morning and daytime cortisol is higher if I use the T cream before bed instead of first thing in the morning. I certainly feel different when I do this, and have more energy in the day.
thats the one form of trt I never got to try. I have a new born at home now also   

Injections even with a dialed in protocol on paper caused to much anxiety for me in the long run. Iím not to bad off just all my body pain is back.

53chevy

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Re: How to raise cortisol?
« Reply #24 on: March 07, 2018, 02:49:34 pm »
Progesterone cream brought my cortisol up. I use 20-40 mg at night before bed.

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Re: How to raise cortisol?
« Reply #24 on: March 07, 2018, 02:49:34 pm »