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Author Topic: Multiple Sclerosis (MS) Risk and Excitotoxins  (Read 9623 times)

Blade78

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Multiple Sclerosis (MS) Risk and Excitotoxins
« on: July 02, 2012, 09:03:03 pm »

I find this interesting.

http://www.mult-sclerosis.org/famous.html

famous people who have MS...and Dr baylor has been warning about the hazards of ingesting aspartame for years.  In his book, "Excitotoxins: The Taste that Kills," Blaylock says that Aspartame and Multiple Sclerosis (MS) are closely related. The Multiple Sclerosis society, however, denies there is any connection between MS and Aspartame. It may be that the Society has chosen to hang on to industry funding rather than to warn its members of the toxic potential of Aspartame. Blaylock explains the biological mechanism by which Aspartame circumvents the blood-brain-barrier and gets at vital nervous tissues"
http://www.tuberose.com/LiveWithRussellBlaylock.pdf


Chrissy Amphlett - lead singer with the Divinyls
Jacqueline Creed Archer - Civil rights activist
Javier Artero - Spanish soccer player
Louise Arters - Actress (one of the Sparkle Twins)
April Arvan - Basketball Coach

B

Dave Balon - Canadian ice hockey player and coach
Stan Belinda - baseball player
Richard Berghammer - Wildlife Painter
Jackie Bertone - percussionist for Beach Boys and others
Michael Blake - Hollywood screenwriter, "Dances with Wolves"
Bill Bradbury - Secretary of State of Oregon
Rachelle Breslow - author
Nicky Broyd - BBC Radio Journalist
Martin Bruch - Photographer
Deborah Bruening - writer
Clive Burr - Iron Maiden Drummer

C

Dan Carnevale - American Footballer
Neil Cavuto - lead anchor on Fox News Channel
Donal Coghlan - singer/songwriter
Benjamin Cohen - technology correspondent for Channel 4 news
Richard Cohen - journalist (married to actress Meridith Viera)
Sean Coman (aka Sean Donahue) - Californian disk jockey
Luca Coscione - Italian Politician
Charlie Courtauld - British newspaper columnist (Independent on Sunday)
Carrel Cowan-Ricks - historical archaeologist and anthropologist
Roland 'Chubby' Cloutier - TV Entertainer
Guido Crepax - Italian comic
Betty Cuthbert - Olympic Gold Medallist, Sprinting

D

Deanna Davis - Basketball player and coach
Denise Davis - Singer
Sir Augustus Frederic D'Este (1794-1848) - grandson of King George III of England, 1st documented case of MS
Joan Didion - writer and director
Bruno Tassan Din - Italian publisher
Tamara Dobson - American actress and fashion model
Wayne Dobson - magician
Deborah Downey - Cabaret Performer
Khiawatha Downey - American Footballer
Jacqueline du Pre - cellist
Frank DuBois - New Mexico Secretary of Agriculture 1989-, champion teamroper
Michel Dupuis - Canadian football player (linebacker for Ottawa, Winnipeg & Toronto)
Michael R. Duval - Investment Banker and White House Lawyer Under Nixon and Ford

E

Allan Eagleson - Hockey impresario & lawyer
Stanley Elkin - writer

F

Donna Fargo - Country and western singer
Lola Falana - singer
Bryan Forbes - actor, writer, director (married to Nanette Newman)
Michael Frimkess - Potter
Annette Funicello - singer, dancer, former Mouseketeer

G

Roman Gabriel - American football player (Los Angeles Rams 1962-72)
Teri Garr - Actress (Young Frankenstein, Tootsie, Close Encounters and others)
Sarah P. Gibbs - Biologist - Winner of 2003 Gilbert Morgan Smith Medal
Brenda Gildehaus - champion BMX bike rider
Marianne Gingrich - ex-wife of former House Speaker Newt Gingrich
Chrystal Gomes - stand up comedienne
Beverly Graham - singer, charity worker
Judy Graham - author
Judy Grahn - poet
Nicola Griffith - Author
Robin Gurr - poet

H

William Hartnell - British actor (the first Doctor Who)
Joseph Hartzler - Chief prosecutor for the Oklahoma bombing case
Eve Hayes - actress
Heinrich Heine - German poet (1797-1856) posthumously diagnosed with MS
Stewart Henry - UK disc-jockey
Lucien Hervé - Architectural Photographer
Jimmy Heuga - Olympic skier
John Hicklenton - British comic artist
Lena Horne - Actress and singer
Alastair Hignell - International Rugby Player, Cricketer and BBC Sports Commentator
Jennifer Huget - Washington Post journalist
Fred Hughes - Andy Warhol's financeer and manager
David Humm - NFL quarterback, Oakland Raiders

I

Iman Ali - Pakistani actor and model
Frieda Inescort - actress
Ivalio Iordanov - Bulgarian International soccer player
Brian Irvine - Scottish soccer player

J

Valerie Jankowski Skrabut - artist and musician.
Barbara Jordan - Congress woman, professor, civil rights activist

K

Jonathan Katz - Comedian
Hal Ketchum - Country & Western Singer
Johnny Killen - 1960s singer
Susan Kisslinger - Author
Stanley Knowles - Canadian Politician (1942-1984)

L

David "Squiggy" Lander - actor in the American TV show "Laverne & Shirley,"
Carl Laemmle, Jr. - film producer and son of the founder of Universal Studios
Ronnie Lane - musician with The Faces (Rod Stewart's old band)
James LaRocca - Guitarist with MS
Melanie Lawson - Anchorwoman, Ch.13 Houston
Margaret Leighton - British actress
Wendy Lill - Canadian Politician
Kathryn Lindskoog - author
Lydwina of Schieden - Dutch patron Saint of Ice Skaters (1400AD) The earliest written record of someone with MS

M

Ernie McAlister - US Politician
Roger MacDougall - British playwright
David Maclean - UK Conservative MP - Chief Whip
Fiona MacTaggart - British Politician (Labour MP for Slough)
Nancy Mairs - novelist
Natalie Mandzhavidze - NASA Physicist
Maureen Manley - Olympic Cyclist
Emily Mann - director and playwright
Diana Markham - Novelist
Miquel Martm i Pol - Catalan poet
Maxine Mesinger - Newspaper gossip columnist, Houston Chronicle
Laura Mitchell - Public policy analyst, consultant and writer
Mary Mullarkey - Colorado State Supreme Court Chief Justice
John Mythen - cartoonist and writer

N

William Newman - artist
Ken Novak - Basketball coach
Paul Novoselick - Chronicle staff writer and columnist

O

Cindy O'Connor - Poet
Alan Osmond - Singer in Osmond Brothers
Jim Oelschlager - financeer and philanathropist

P

John Pageler - author
Lisa Peck - Mountain bike rider (5th in 2000 Masters World Mountain Bike Championships)
Colin Pillinger - British scientist, leader of Beagle 2 Mission to Mars
Jim Poulin - Basketball Coach
Richard Pryor - comedian and actor

Q

Richard Queen - Iran hostage

R

Richard Radtke - Scientist and Winner Presidential Award for Excellence in Science, Mathematics and Engineering
Jacques Raverat - Artist
Adam Riedy - US Speed Skater
Madeline Rhue - Actress
John Robson - Footballer
Doug Robinson - Novelist
Fausto Rocha - Brazilian TV Actor
Ronald Rogers - Concert Pianist
Anne Romney - wife of Mitt Romney (American politician)
Wendy Carol Roth - Television producer, writer and Advocate for the Disabled

S

James Scofield - poet
Jordan Sigalet - Canadian ice hockey player
Eric Simons - mountaineer
Dean Singleton - Newspaper Magnate
Keith Snyder - composer, performer, and author
Aaron Solowoniuk - drummer for Canadian band Billy Talent
Henry Steele - Basketball Player
Stephanie Stephens - golfer
Kevin Stevenson - Singer/Guitarist
Tim Stevens - Scottish disc jockey
Karen G. Stone - Author
Sharon Summerall - model (married to Don Henley (singer with The Eagles)
Kelly Sutton - racing driver
Joan Sweeney - children's author
Jim Sweeney - British actor and comedian
Mike Szymanski - entertainment writer and managing editor of zap2it.com

T

Tamia - R&B singer (Grammy Nominee)
David "Teddy" Thomas - Cricketer
Mitch Terpstra - Athlete and Althetics Coach
Bobby Thompson - Banjoist
Joe Torsella - US Politician
Larry Tucker - Film and TV writer and producer (incl. The Monkees, Alice B. Toklas and Bob & Carol)
Yury Tynianov - Russian Novelist and literary critic

V

Don Van Vilet (aka Captain Beefheart) - musican & singer/songwriter
Norah Vincent - Journalist

W

Wally Wakefield - Ski jumper and sports columnist
Jackie Waldman - Author and motivational speaker
Clay Walker - Country and western singer
Danny Wallace - Soccer Player
Clifford T.Ward - Singer/songwriter
Rich Warden - Racecar Driver
Robert "Wingnut" Weaver - Actor
Maggie Weder - Golfer
Cathy Weis - Dancer
Paul Wellstone - US Senator, Minnesota
Stephen White - Author
Paul Willey - Virtual Golf Champion
Montel Williams - talk show host and actor
Victoria Williams - Singer
Victor Willing - Artist
Paul Wolfskehl - 19th century German industrialist and amateur mathematician

Y

Ivaylo Yordanov - Bulgarian footballer

Relatives

Wade Boggs' (baseball player) sister
Gloria Estefan's (singer) father
Marg Helgenberger's (actress) father
Tommy Hilfiger's (designer) sister
Larry Kane's (TV news anchorman) mother
Chris Moss's (basketball player) mother
Patty Murray's (US senator) father
Stone Phillips' (Dateline NBC) wife
J K Rowling's (author of the Harry Potter stories) mother
Adam Sandler's (comedian/actor) Cousin
Daniel J. Travanti's (actor) brother
Eddie Vedder's (Pearl Jam) father
Henry "Gizmo" Williams (American footballer) mother
“Don’t you feel good when you go to the gym?’ Not at all. There’s too many people in-shape there. When I go to McDonald’s I feel great. At McDonald’s I’m Matthew McConaughey.” --Jim Gaffigan - Mr. Universe

PeakT

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Re: Multiple Sclerosis (MS) Risk and Excitotoxins
« Reply #1 on: July 02, 2012, 09:21:31 pm »
You know that I think excitotoxins are inconscionable.  That said, multiple sclerosis has many risk factors.  It's kind of like heart disease in that there is probably no one factor that is responsible for all the issues because it has multiple failure points. 

Here are a few examples:

1.  Vitamin D.  "Vitamin D intake and incidence of multiple sclerosis"

2. TNF and Inflammation. "Matrix metalloproteinases, tumor necrosis factor and multiple sclerosis: an overview"

3.  Epstein-Barr Virus.  http://jem.rupress.org/content/204/12/2899.short "Dysregulated Epstein-Barr virus infection in the multiple sclerosis brain"
THE MOST COMPREHENSIVE BOOK ON TRT/TESTOSTERONE:
https://www.amazon.com/Natural-Versus-Testosterone-Therapy-Myer/dp/1523210532/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1499116128&sr=8-1&keywords=natural+versus+testosterone+therapy
And check out my New Peak Testosterone Program: http://www.peaktestosterone.com/peak_testosterone_program
If you are on medications or have a medical condition, always check with your doctor first before making any lifestyle changes or taking new supplements.  And low testosterone is a medical condition.

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Re: Multiple Sclerosis (MS) Risk and Excitotoxins
« Reply #1 on: July 02, 2012, 09:21:31 pm »


Blade78

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Re: Multiple Sclerosis (MS) Risk and Excitotoxins
« Reply #2 on: July 02, 2012, 09:51:14 pm »
You know that I think excitotoxins are inconscionable.  That said, multiple sclerosis has many risk factors.  It's kind of like heart disease in that there is probably no one factor that is responsible for all the issues because it has multiple failure points. 

Here are a few examples:

1.  Vitamin D.  "Vitamin D intake and incidence of multiple sclerosis"

2. TNF and Inflammation. "Matrix metalloproteinases, tumor necrosis factor and multiple sclerosis: an overview"

3.  Epstein-Barr Virus.  http://jem.rupress.org/content/204/12/2899.short "Dysregulated Epstein-Barr virus infection in the multiple sclerosis brain"
yes, do they even know what really causes heart diease? 
some same cholestrol,  some say that's a myth, it has to do with The Cholesterol Myth

- Inflammation causes heart disease, not cholesterol

http://www.parkridgecardiology.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=93:cholesterol-myth&catid=2:health-nuggets&Itemid=20
“Don’t you feel good when you go to the gym?’ Not at all. There’s too many people in-shape there. When I go to McDonald’s I feel great. At McDonald’s I’m Matthew McConaughey.” --Jim Gaffigan - Mr. Universe

PeakT

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Re: Multiple Sclerosis (MS) Risk and Excitotoxins
« Reply #3 on: July 02, 2012, 10:11:56 pm »
Sure.  Who's arguing that?  Not me. 

But here's the rub:  low carb diets will raise inflammation in many cases:

Again, read this link by this countercultural guy Lee Myer for some examples from the research as to how it can increase inflammation, increase arterial plaque, decrease vasoreactivity and slow down blood flow:

http://www.peaktestosterone.com/Atkins_Low_Carb_Diet

So when you are dieting and your inflammation levels are low, you may be okay.  And perhaps if you exercise enough, you can overcome these effects.

But, as I have stated on other threads, if you don't live perfectly, you are going to hammer your arteries...

So, yes, you need to limit inflammation and that includes watching out for Low Carb Diets.

By the way, I don't even like talking about such diets because they are so popular right now.  But you asked me to "fire away" so that's what I'm doing...

And, yes, I agree that inflammation is probably the biggest risk factor for both Mulitiple Sclerosis AND heart disease, even outweighing cholesterol.
« Last Edit: July 02, 2012, 10:19:05 pm by PeakT »
THE MOST COMPREHENSIVE BOOK ON TRT/TESTOSTERONE:
https://www.amazon.com/Natural-Versus-Testosterone-Therapy-Myer/dp/1523210532/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1499116128&sr=8-1&keywords=natural+versus+testosterone+therapy
And check out my New Peak Testosterone Program: http://www.peaktestosterone.com/peak_testosterone_program
If you are on medications or have a medical condition, always check with your doctor first before making any lifestyle changes or taking new supplements.  And low testosterone is a medical condition.

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Re: Multiple Sclerosis (MS) Risk and Excitotoxins
« Reply #3 on: July 02, 2012, 10:11:56 pm »


Blade78

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Re: Multiple Sclerosis (MS) Risk and Excitotoxins
« Reply #4 on: July 02, 2012, 11:04:12 pm »
Sure.  Who's arguing that?  Not me. 

But here's the rub:  low carb diets will raise inflammation in many cases:
http://www.peaktestosterone.com/Atkins_Low_Carb_Diet

yes, I read that and I dont have that study, Vascular effects of a low-carbohydrate high-protein diet", Proceedings of the National Academy of Science, Published online 25 August 2009, Foo S, Heller ER, W20) Prevention, Apr 2010, p. 45.. to know why that is.
people on atkins would comsume as much fatty meat as they could, not consume carbohydrates, then lose water due to depletion(no glycogen to hold the water) and lose weight(10-20lbs in 2 weeks)
then they would get off the diet, comsume carbohydrates, regain the water and the weight and wonder, "wtf happened?"

sounds like something a typical american would do, sadly my friends GP(who's an MD) did and complained about the "atkins diet


so why does a low carb diet cause inflammation to increase?
 what if the protein all came from eggwhites, (NO HCAs, etc)

Again, read this link by this countercultural guy Lee Myer for some examples from the research as to how it can increase inflammation, increase arterial plaque, decrease vasoreactivity and slow down blood flow:

So when you are dieting and your inflammation levels are low, you may be okay.  And perhaps if you exercise enough, you can overcome these effects.

But, as I have stated on other threads, if you don't live perfectly, you are going to hammer your arteries...

So, yes, you need to limit inflammation and that includes watching out for Low Carb Diets.

By the way, I don't even like talking about such diets because they are so popular right now.  But you asked me to "fire away" so that's what I'm doing...
I believe I asked before how to measure inflammation levels, besides a  Crp test, as when I "my diet"(food I eat on a daily basis) doesnt contain much fat. aside from the pure fat I get from Carlsons omega-3s...

Im also not understanding why dieting on a low carb diet would cause inflammation to increase? but that's likely a moot point as  I do stay away from processed carbs, but I bet I have over 100 carbs a day via  following what that Lee myer dude says to do regarding eating tomatoes, fruit and pomegranate juice, prunes, non starchy veggies(broccoli) and cacao powder, and 3 supersized mcdonald meals/day---opps(scratch that last one, Freudian slip)

And, yes, I agree that inflammation is probably the biggest risk factor for both Mulitiple Sclerosis AND heart disease, even outweighing cholesterol.
yes and that is the secondary reason why I hang around this site because I was hung up on inflammation before coming here and you hitting that topic hard with sciencey stuff is irrestible.
also, the babes, the sheer number of babes that hang out here....
“Don’t you feel good when you go to the gym?’ Not at all. There’s too many people in-shape there. When I go to McDonald’s I feel great. At McDonald’s I’m Matthew McConaughey.” --Jim Gaffigan - Mr. Universe

PeakT

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Re: Multiple Sclerosis (MS) Risk and Excitotoxins
« Reply #5 on: July 03, 2012, 05:19:15 am »
Prunes?  Man, no wonder you're mad at me.

CRP is a good start and is what everyone is familiar with.  But there is much, much more you can do if you have a little extra cash:

http://www.lef.org/Vitamins-Supplements/ItemLCCYT/Cytokine-Panel-Blood-Test.html

Babes? Well, my Twitter account actually has more female readers than males...
« Last Edit: July 03, 2012, 05:26:52 am by PeakT »
THE MOST COMPREHENSIVE BOOK ON TRT/TESTOSTERONE:
https://www.amazon.com/Natural-Versus-Testosterone-Therapy-Myer/dp/1523210532/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1499116128&sr=8-1&keywords=natural+versus+testosterone+therapy
And check out my New Peak Testosterone Program: http://www.peaktestosterone.com/peak_testosterone_program
If you are on medications or have a medical condition, always check with your doctor first before making any lifestyle changes or taking new supplements.  And low testosterone is a medical condition.

Blade78

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Re: Multiple Sclerosis (MS) Risk and Excitotoxins
« Reply #6 on: July 07, 2012, 11:44:26 pm »
Prunes?  Man, no wonder you're mad at me.

CRP is a good start and is what everyone is familiar with.  But there is much, much more you can do if you have a little extra cash:

http://www.lef.org/Vitamins-Supplements/ItemLCCYT/Cytokine-Panel-Blood-Test.html

Babes? Well, my Twitter account actually has more female readers than males...

not mad?  Not sure where that came from

but you are bashing "low carb" diets by saying they increase harm to the arteries and I am not understanding why
I think, because of what I read on  the links you gave, is that you are saying, "low carb' is synonymous with "high fat"
but what about low carb and low fat?

yes, a person can buy  spend $$ and test whatever they want for whatever they want(I want to test my body for mercury..http://drhyman.com/blog/conditions/mercury-get-this-poison-out-of-your-body/


but I want to know what it is about low carb diets that is so bad?
low carb is 0-50 carbs, fat is held as close to zero as possible with the exception of omega 3s plus 200grams of  protein from eggwhites
and you are suggesting that diet is bad because it is low in carbs?
Im not finding this by looking at the sources you list on the "danger atkins" page, can you extrapolate more why my low carb diet is bad for my arteries?
“Don’t you feel good when you go to the gym?’ Not at all. There’s too many people in-shape there. When I go to McDonald’s I feel great. At McDonald’s I’m Matthew McConaughey.” --Jim Gaffigan - Mr. Universe

PeakT

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Re: Multiple Sclerosis (MS) Risk and Excitotoxins
« Reply #7 on: July 08, 2012, 12:35:21 am »


but what about low carb and low fat?


So I guess you're asking about something like the Dukan Diet?  Again, if you're losing weight, then you have little to worry about no matter how you eat.

Now I can't imagine how one can eat low carb and low fat and not lose weight, so you'll have to explain that to me.  Not sure whwere you are headed...
THE MOST COMPREHENSIVE BOOK ON TRT/TESTOSTERONE:
https://www.amazon.com/Natural-Versus-Testosterone-Therapy-Myer/dp/1523210532/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1499116128&sr=8-1&keywords=natural+versus+testosterone+therapy
And check out my New Peak Testosterone Program: http://www.peaktestosterone.com/peak_testosterone_program
If you are on medications or have a medical condition, always check with your doctor first before making any lifestyle changes or taking new supplements.  And low testosterone is a medical condition.

Blade78

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Re: Multiple Sclerosis (MS) Risk and Excitotoxins
« Reply #8 on: July 08, 2012, 09:51:23 am »


So I guess you're asking about something like the Dukan Diet?  Again, if you're losing weight, then you have little to worry about no matter how you eat.

Now I can't imagine how one can eat low carb and low fat and not lose weight, so you'll have to explain that to me.  Not sure whwere you are headed...
I am not sure why you took the question out of contex then it is very hard to answer.  and I didnt ask about fat loss at all
I  asked
so why does a low carb diet cause inflammation to increase?

I wasnt talking at all about losing weight, I dont understand why this this link is so hard on low carb diets?
http://www.peaktestosterone.com/Atkins_Low_Carb_Diet

UNLESS You are saying a low carb diet must mean high fat... then I understand as any diet high in fat isnt going to be good for the arteries, maybe high in w-3s?
I wrote this and I still dont understand where fat loss came in or why you arent sure where I am going? I thought I asked a straight question
I will bold it
not mad?  Not sure where that came from

but you are bashing "low carb" diets by saying they increase harm to the arteries and I am not understanding why
I think, because of what I read on  the links you gave, is that you are saying, "low carb' is synonymous with "high fat"
but what about low carb and low fat?

but I want to know what it is about low carb diets that is so bad?
low carb is 0-50 carbs, fat is held as close to zero as possible with the exception of omega 3s plus 200grams of  protein from eggwhites
and you are suggesting that diet is bad because it is low in carbs?


Im not finding this by looking at the sources you list on the "danger atkins" page, can you extrapolate more why my low carb diet is bad for my arteries?



“Don’t you feel good when you go to the gym?’ Not at all. There’s too many people in-shape there. When I go to McDonald’s I feel great. At McDonald’s I’m Matthew McConaughey.” --Jim Gaffigan - Mr. Universe

PeakT

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Re: Multiple Sclerosis (MS) Risk and Excitotoxins
« Reply #9 on: July 08, 2012, 09:43:27 pm »

UNLESS You are saying a low carb diet must mean high fat... then I understand as any diet high in fat isnt going to be good for the arteries, maybe high in w-3s?


Yes, that is exactly where I was headed.  But this may not apply to you based on what you wrote above.  And that's why I paused to see just what you meant.

As you probably know from my site, saturated fat for sure and monos (based on animal studies) accelerate arteriosclerosis.  And polys have their own problems:  they increase the net oxidative load on the body.

Also, sometime you have to say more about how you plan to eat:  you (and a physician recently) have discussed a low carb and low fat diet.  I can't imagine how this would work on a practical level (if you're not losing weight).
« Last Edit: July 08, 2012, 09:49:19 pm by PeakT »
THE MOST COMPREHENSIVE BOOK ON TRT/TESTOSTERONE:
https://www.amazon.com/Natural-Versus-Testosterone-Therapy-Myer/dp/1523210532/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1499116128&sr=8-1&keywords=natural+versus+testosterone+therapy
And check out my New Peak Testosterone Program: http://www.peaktestosterone.com/peak_testosterone_program
If you are on medications or have a medical condition, always check with your doctor first before making any lifestyle changes or taking new supplements.  And low testosterone is a medical condition.

tedrashwin

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Re: Multiple Sclerosis (MS) Risk and Excitotoxins
« Reply #10 on: August 08, 2012, 07:15:05 am »
Multiple Sclerosis?

Have you tried Cell Treatment for  ms treatment
« Last Edit: August 13, 2012, 03:54:06 am by tedrashwin »

PeakT

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Re: Multiple Sclerosis (MS) Risk and Excitotoxins
« Reply #11 on: August 08, 2012, 01:56:48 pm »
Multiple Sclerosis?

Have you tried Cell Treatment for  MS Treatment

He doesn't have MS.
THE MOST COMPREHENSIVE BOOK ON TRT/TESTOSTERONE:
https://www.amazon.com/Natural-Versus-Testosterone-Therapy-Myer/dp/1523210532/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1499116128&sr=8-1&keywords=natural+versus+testosterone+therapy
And check out my New Peak Testosterone Program: http://www.peaktestosterone.com/peak_testosterone_program
If you are on medications or have a medical condition, always check with your doctor first before making any lifestyle changes or taking new supplements.  And low testosterone is a medical condition.

Peak Testosterone Forum

Re: Multiple Sclerosis (MS) Risk and Excitotoxins
« Reply #11 on: August 08, 2012, 01:56:48 pm »