Quantcast

Author Topic: Seasonal Thyroid Disorder  (Read 2553 times)

NickZ

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 246
    • View Profile
Seasonal Thyroid Disorder
« on: November 15, 2017, 05:59:31 pm »

Hello All,

I'm having very strange symptoms this fall/winter.  It started getting colder, and I'm experiencing an increase in cold intolerance, heart pounding/palpitations (low bpm and especially at night when trying to go to sleep), internal head tremors, tinnitus (ringing in the ear) and sleep disruptions.  The sleep disruptions are clock work, usually from 2:30 am and onward.  Every time I wake up the heart pounding, internal tremors and tinnitus are worse, making it difficult to fall back asleep.  I was diagnosed with minor sleep apnea and I am a mouth breather. I can't breathe through my nose at night.  My last TSH reading in December of 2016 was 3.03; Triiodothyronine, Free was 3.1; and T4, Free was 1.25.

Could my minor sleep apnea be causing these symptoms and throwing my hormones out of wack? Should I do a full thyroid panel?

Thank you,

Sean Mosher

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 458
    • View Profile
Re: Seasonal Thyroid Disorder
« Reply #1 on: November 15, 2017, 08:16:54 pm »
That TSH is high and yes, it sounds like it's time to have a complete thyroid panel run for sure.
Patient Liaison
http://www.PrimeBody.com (CODE: PEAKTVIP for 10% Discount)
[Site Sponsor]

NOTE: Comments on this forum are NOT medical advice and are no substitute for individualized patient care. Please consult your personal physician prior to initiating or changing ANY treatment regimen.

Peak Testosterone Forum

Re: Seasonal Thyroid Disorder
« Reply #1 on: November 15, 2017, 08:16:54 pm »


Joe Sixpack

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2314
    • View Profile
Re: Seasonal Thyroid Disorder
« Reply #2 on: November 16, 2017, 01:00:15 am »
Sounds like low cortisol to me.  I get the same kind of symptoms at night.  The theory is that with low cortisol, your body has to do something to keep your blood sugar up.  Cortisol usually takes care of this.  If you have low cortisol, your body resorts to another stress hormone to do the job.  Epinephrin I believe it is.  Keirkegaard might know this one.  Too much epi can leave you with the heart pounding/can't sleep feelings. 

You could test this by getting a 4 point saliva cortisol test.  You test your levels at 4 diff times during the day.  The last testing period being midnight, which is pretty close to when you have your symptoms.

Are you on TRT?  TRT can trigger low cortisol.  Whenever I get more than 140mg/week of testosterone my low cort symptoms get much worse.   
Age: 55, Ht: 5'08", Wt: 155 lbs
Protocol: 25 mg T Cyp + 25 IU HCG M,W,F + 2 clicks T Cream + 15mg DHEA + 15mg Pregnenalone daily.
12/2018 test results: TT: 1054 ng/dL (264-916), FT: 17.2 pg/mL (7.2-24), E2: 21.6 pg/mL sensitive (8.0-35.0)

NickZ

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 246
    • View Profile
Re: Seasonal Thyroid Disorder
« Reply #3 on: November 16, 2017, 06:11:23 pm »
Thank you Joe. Interesting, my last 4 point saliva test read high cortisol and out of range at 3:30 am.  I'm not on TRT. What's also strange is every time I wake up, I have rock hard erections.  This is new.  I'm not taking any medications or supplements. 

Peak Testosterone Forum

Re: Seasonal Thyroid Disorder
« Reply #3 on: November 16, 2017, 06:11:23 pm »


Kierkegaard

  • Moderator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3623
  • Hormone Shrink
    • View Profile
Re: Seasonal Thyroid Disorder
« Reply #4 on: November 16, 2017, 07:05:57 pm »
Thyroid function does indeed fluctuate based on seasons, but it's not enough for the vast majority of people to push them into hypothyroid territory. 
"The same thing that makes you live can kill you in the end." -- Neil Young

March 2014: Dx low T (158ng/dl)
September 2015: Dx hypothyroidism, other adrenal hypofunction
2016: chronic fatigue, unspecified

Depression and anxiety guide: http://www.peaktestosterone.com/Help_Anxiety_Depression

Joe Sixpack

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2314
    • View Profile
Re: Seasonal Thyroid Disorder
« Reply #5 on: November 18, 2017, 03:12:36 am »
Thank you Joe. Interesting, my last 4 point saliva test read high cortisol and out of range at 3:30 am.  I'm not on TRT. What's also strange is every time I wake up, I have rock hard erections.  This is new.  I'm not taking any medications or supplements.
Hmm.  On this out of range cortisol test.... What did you do, wake up at 3:30 and take a reading then?  And you were out of range on the high side?  That's really odd.  So maybe your cortisol is giving you those strange symptoms?
Age: 55, Ht: 5'08", Wt: 155 lbs
Protocol: 25 mg T Cyp + 25 IU HCG M,W,F + 2 clicks T Cream + 15mg DHEA + 15mg Pregnenalone daily.
12/2018 test results: TT: 1054 ng/dL (264-916), FT: 17.2 pg/mL (7.2-24), E2: 21.6 pg/mL sensitive (8.0-35.0)

PeakT

  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 38446
    • View Profile
    • Peak Testosterone
Re: Seasonal Thyroid Disorder
« Reply #6 on: November 18, 2017, 04:49:23 pm »

Hello All,

I'm having very strange symptoms this fall/winter.  It started getting colder, and I'm experiencing an increase in cold intolerance, heart pounding/palpitations (low bpm and especially at night when trying to go to sleep), internal head tremors, tinnitus (ringing in the ear) and sleep disruptions.  The sleep disruptions are clock work, usually from 2:30 am and onward.  Every time I wake up the heart pounding, internal tremors and tinnitus are worse, making it difficult to fall back asleep.  I was diagnosed with minor sleep apnea and I am a mouth breather. I can't breathe through my nose at night.  My last TSH reading in December of 2016 was 3.03; Triiodothyronine, Free was 3.1; and T4, Free was 1.25.

Could my minor sleep apnea be causing these symptoms and throwing my hormones out of wack? Should I do a full thyroid panel?

Thank you,

Yes, apnea can affect thyroid function per this:

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24622960

"The mean apnea duration significantly correlated with TSH in both simple and multiple regression analyses. Subjects with lower FT3 (≤3.75 pg/ml) showed longer mean apnea time compared to those with higher FT3 (>3.75 pg/ml) (24.9  0.8 vs. 20.2  1.2 s; P = 0.009). The other indices of sleep apnea did not show significant correlation with thyroid function."
THE MOST COMPREHENSIVE BOOK ON TRT/TESTOSTERONE:
https://www.amazon.com/Natural-Versus-Testosterone-Therapy-Myer/dp/1523210532/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1499116128&sr=8-1&keywords=natural+versus+testosterone+therapy
And check out my New Peak Testosterone Program: http://www.peaktestosterone.com/peak_testosterone_program
If you are on medications or have a medical condition, always check with your doctor first before making any lifestyle changes or taking new supplements.  And low testosterone is a medical condition.

Peak Testosterone Forum

Re: Seasonal Thyroid Disorder
« Reply #6 on: November 18, 2017, 04:49:23 pm »