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Author Topic: Excess DHT and P.E.  (Read 10877 times)

Peyt

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Excess DHT and P.E.
« on: October 26, 2015, 01:18:43 pm »
Hi Guys,
Does anyone know if there is any relationship between excess DHT and P.E.?
Thanks

PeakT

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Re: Excess DHT and P.E.
« Reply #1 on: October 26, 2015, 08:28:36 pm »
Hi Guys,
Does anyone know if there is any relationship between excess DHT and P.E.?
Thanks

Int'g idea.  I don't see any studies on it tho.   Why do you ask?
THE MOST COMPREHENSIVE BOOK ON TRT/TESTOSTERONE:
https://www.amazon.com/Natural-Versus-Testosterone-Therapy-Myer/dp/1523210532/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1499116128&sr=8-1&keywords=natural+versus+testosterone+therapy
And check out my New Peak Testosterone Program: http://www.peaktestosterone.com/peak_testosterone_program
If you are on medications or have a medical condition, always check with your doctor first before making any lifestyle changes or taking new supplements.  And low testosterone is a medical condition.

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Re: Excess DHT and P.E.
« Reply #1 on: October 26, 2015, 08:28:36 pm »


Kierkegaard

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Re: Excess DHT and P.E.
« Reply #2 on: October 26, 2015, 08:57:13 pm »
PE is often driven by excess norepinephrine.  How's your thyroid?
"The same thing that makes you live can kill you in the end." -- Neil Young

March 2014: Dx low T (158ng/dl)
September 2015: Dx hypothyroidism, other adrenal hypofunction
2016: chronic fatigue, unspecified

Depression and anxiety guide: http://www.peaktestosterone.com/Help_Anxiety_Depression

Peyt

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Re: Excess DHT and P.E.
« Reply #3 on: October 26, 2015, 11:08:19 pm »
PE is often driven by excess norepinephrine.  How's your thyroid?

My thyroid is okay as far as tests but you are right on as far as excess norepinephrine,
I have the COMT+ gene and it causes excess norepinephrine,
Any suggestions on how I can lower it?
I use magnesium at night which has been great to promote sleep but has not done anything for PE

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Re: Excess DHT and P.E.
« Reply #3 on: October 26, 2015, 11:08:19 pm »


Kierkegaard

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Re: Excess DHT and P.E.
« Reply #4 on: October 26, 2015, 11:18:39 pm »
PE is often driven by excess norepinephrine.  How's your thyroid?

My thyroid is okay as far as tests but you are right on as far as excess norepinephrine,
I have the COMT+ gene and it causes excess norepinephrine,
Any suggestions on how I can lower it?
I use magnesium at night which has been great to promote sleep but has not done anything for PE

Oh wow, I didn't even think of that connection!  I'll be looking into genetic testing. 

As for lowering norepinephrine, it's hard to find good substances, but from what I can tell l-theanine and rhodiola are known to lower norepinephrine.  I'm taking an adrenal supplement called "Adrenal Health" by Gaia, and it's been the only supplement that has made my erections and libido better, indicating lowered NE (it has rhodiola and ashwagandha). 

http://www.lifeextension.com/magazine/2011/3/the-chemistry-of-calm/Page-01

The above link has inositol, omega-3s, and n-acecyl-cysteine (NAC) as other supplements.  I'm currently thinking my problems are caused by excess norepinephrine (though I don't have PE, except every now and then).  Theoretically, if you have lower than optimal cortisol, this would mean higher norepinephrine, given that cortisol is what lowers the stress response (including NE, which is what starts it via the locus coeruleus in the brain stem).

The reason I mentioned thyroid is that hypothyroidism involves elevated levels of norepinphrine (lots of people, including doctors, don't know this).  Do you have your thyroid numbers?  I think shooting for the upper fourth of the range for free T3 is the way to go, so there's usually room for improvement in most people.  Gaia makes another supplement for thyroid that I'll be asking my doc about in a few days, so that might be enough to give it a bump. 

ETA: how's your sleep and stress level, btw?  Any chance you get brain fog?
« Last Edit: October 26, 2015, 11:20:30 pm by Kierkegaard »
"The same thing that makes you live can kill you in the end." -- Neil Young

March 2014: Dx low T (158ng/dl)
September 2015: Dx hypothyroidism, other adrenal hypofunction
2016: chronic fatigue, unspecified

Depression and anxiety guide: http://www.peaktestosterone.com/Help_Anxiety_Depression

Kierkegaard

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Re: Excess DHT and P.E.
« Reply #5 on: October 26, 2015, 11:24:53 pm »
You're making me wonder.  I got tested for the MTHFR polymorphism and came back as compound heterozygous, so the doc puts me on relatively high doses of methylated B vitamins.  These only made me feel worse, and it was just recently that I realized that folate increases NE.  So in my case the compound heterozygous MTHFR mutation might be slightly offsetting a possible COMT mutation. 
"The same thing that makes you live can kill you in the end." -- Neil Young

March 2014: Dx low T (158ng/dl)
September 2015: Dx hypothyroidism, other adrenal hypofunction
2016: chronic fatigue, unspecified

Depression and anxiety guide: http://www.peaktestosterone.com/Help_Anxiety_Depression

Peyt

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Re: Excess DHT and P.E.
« Reply #6 on: October 27, 2015, 12:10:56 am »
PE is often driven by excess norepinephrine.  How's your thyroid?

My thyroid is okay as far as tests but you are right on as far as excess norepinephrine,
I have the COMT+ gene and it causes excess norepinephrine,
Any suggestions on how I can lower it?
I use magnesium at night which has been great to promote sleep but has not done anything for PE

Oh wow, I didn't even think of that connection!  I'll be looking into genetic testing. 

As for lowering norepinephrine, it's hard to find good substances, but from what I can tell l-theanine and rhodiola are known to lower norepinephrine.  I'm taking an adrenal supplement called "Adrenal Health" by Gaia, and it's been the only supplement that has made my erections and libido better, indicating lowered NE (it has rhodiola and ashwagandha). 

http://www.lifeextension.com/magazine/2011/3/the-chemistry-of-calm/Page-01

The above link has inositol, omega-3s, and n-acecyl-cysteine (NAC) as other supplements.  I'm currently thinking my problems are caused by excess norepinephrine (though I don't have PE, except every now and then).  Theoretically, if you have lower than optimal cortisol, this would mean higher norepinephrine, given that cortisol is what lowers the stress response (including NE, which is what starts it via the locus coeruleus in the brain stem).

The reason I mentioned thyroid is that hypothyroidism involves elevated levels of norepinphrine (lots of people, including doctors, don't know this).  Do you have your thyroid numbers?  I think shooting for the upper fourth of the range for free T3 is the way to go, so there's usually room for improvement in most people.  Gaia makes another supplement for thyroid that I'll be asking my doc about in a few days, so that might be enough to give it a bump. 

ETA: how's your sleep and stress level, btw?  Any chance you get brain fog?

Wow, I had no idea there is a correlation between Cortisol and Norepenephrine.... I have high Cortisol too, no wonder
when I take P.S. to lower Cortisol I get really bad headaches and anger..... It's probably jacking up my Norepenephrine...
This is been a real problem for me... I wish there was a supplement that would lower each one without effecting the other.

Out of the supplements that you mentioned I have pretty much tried all (Ashwaghanda, Rohdiola, Omega-3 and NAC) and the first 3 cure my P.E. but give me anger and headaches...

As far as Thyroid, here are my numbers:
TSH 2.58 (Range 0.45-4.5)
Pregnenolone  97
T4 = 1.39 (range 0.82-1.77)
Reverse T3 14.3 (range 9.2- 24.1)

So my thyroid is in check.

Peyt

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Re: Excess DHT and P.E.
« Reply #7 on: October 27, 2015, 12:13:42 am »
You're making me wonder.  I got tested for the MTHFR polymorphism and came back as compound heterozygous, so the doc puts me on relatively high doses of methylated B vitamins.  These only made me feel worse, and it was just recently that I realized that folate increases NE.  So in my case the compound heterozygous MTHFR mutation might be slightly offsetting a possible COMT mutation.

I spent a couple of years trying to figure out the MTHRF test results and spent a couple of thousand dollars with 3 different doctors and finally came to the conclusion that although they have some answers such as why something is wrong, they are yet to find solutions that fixes them without causing other side effects... so I let it go for now

Kierkegaard

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Re: Excess DHT and P.E.
« Reply #8 on: October 27, 2015, 12:41:32 am »
PE is often driven by excess norepinephrine.  How's your thyroid?

My thyroid is okay as far as tests but you are right on as far as excess norepinephrine,
I have the COMT+ gene and it causes excess norepinephrine,
Any suggestions on how I can lower it?
I use magnesium at night which has been great to promote sleep but has not done anything for PE

Oh wow, I didn't even think of that connection!  I'll be looking into genetic testing. 

As for lowering norepinephrine, it's hard to find good substances, but from what I can tell l-theanine and rhodiola are known to lower norepinephrine.  I'm taking an adrenal supplement called "Adrenal Health" by Gaia, and it's been the only supplement that has made my erections and libido better, indicating lowered NE (it has rhodiola and ashwagandha). 

http://www.lifeextension.com/magazine/2011/3/the-chemistry-of-calm/Page-01

The above link has inositol, omega-3s, and n-acecyl-cysteine (NAC) as other supplements.  I'm currently thinking my problems are caused by excess norepinephrine (though I don't have PE, except every now and then).  Theoretically, if you have lower than optimal cortisol, this would mean higher norepinephrine, given that cortisol is what lowers the stress response (including NE, which is what starts it via the locus coeruleus in the brain stem).

The reason I mentioned thyroid is that hypothyroidism involves elevated levels of norepinphrine (lots of people, including doctors, don't know this).  Do you have your thyroid numbers?  I think shooting for the upper fourth of the range for free T3 is the way to go, so there's usually room for improvement in most people.  Gaia makes another supplement for thyroid that I'll be asking my doc about in a few days, so that might be enough to give it a bump. 

ETA: how's your sleep and stress level, btw?  Any chance you get brain fog?

Wow, I had no idea there is a correlation between Cortisol and Norepenephrine.... I have high Cortisol too, no wonder
when I take P.S. to lower Cortisol I get really bad headaches and anger..... It's probably jacking up my Norepenephrine...
This is been a real problem for me... I wish there was a supplement that would lower each one without effecting the other.

Out of the supplements that you mentioned I have pretty much tried all (Ashwaghanda, Rohdiola, Omega-3 and NAC) and the first 3 cure my P.E. but give me anger and headaches...

As far as Thyroid, here are my numbers:
TSH 2.58 (Range 0.45-4.5)
Pregnenolone  97
T4 = 1.39 (range 0.82-1.77)
Reverse T3 14.3 (range 9.2- 24.1)

So my thyroid is in check.

Those numbers look good, but have you had a free T3 number pulled?  It's probably fine, but it's also the most important thyroid number you can get. 
"The same thing that makes you live can kill you in the end." -- Neil Young

March 2014: Dx low T (158ng/dl)
September 2015: Dx hypothyroidism, other adrenal hypofunction
2016: chronic fatigue, unspecified

Depression and anxiety guide: http://www.peaktestosterone.com/Help_Anxiety_Depression

Peyt

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Re: Excess DHT and P.E.
« Reply #9 on: October 27, 2015, 01:14:04 am »
PE is often driven by excess norepinephrine.  How's your thyroid?

My thyroid is okay as far as tests but you are right on as far as excess norepinephrine,
I have the COMT+ gene and it causes excess norepinephrine,
Any suggestions on how I can lower it?
I use magnesium at night which has been great to promote sleep but has not done anything for PE

Oh wow, I didn't even think of that connection!  I'll be looking into genetic testing. 

As for lowering norepinephrine, it's hard to find good substances, but from what I can tell l-theanine and rhodiola are known to lower norepinephrine.  I'm taking an adrenal supplement called "Adrenal Health" by Gaia, and it's been the only supplement that has made my erections and libido better, indicating lowered NE (it has rhodiola and ashwagandha). 

http://www.lifeextension.com/magazine/2011/3/the-chemistry-of-calm/Page-01

The above link has inositol, omega-3s, and n-acecyl-cysteine (NAC) as other supplements.  I'm currently thinking my problems are caused by excess norepinephrine (though I don't have PE, except every now and then).  Theoretically, if you have lower than optimal cortisol, this would mean higher norepinephrine, given that cortisol is what lowers the stress response (including NE, which is what starts it via the locus coeruleus in the brain stem).

The reason I mentioned thyroid is that hypothyroidism involves elevated levels of norepinphrine (lots of people, including doctors, don't know this).  Do you have your thyroid numbers?  I think shooting for the upper fourth of the range for free T3 is the way to go, so there's usually room for improvement in most people.  Gaia makes another supplement for thyroid that I'll be asking my doc about in a few days, so that might be enough to give it a bump. 

ETA: how's your sleep and stress level, btw?  Any chance you get brain fog?

Wow, I had no idea there is a correlation between Cortisol and Norepenephrine.... I have high Cortisol too, no wonder
when I take P.S. to lower Cortisol I get really bad headaches and anger..... It's probably jacking up my Norepenephrine...
This is been a real problem for me... I wish there was a supplement that would lower each one without effecting the other.

Out of the supplements that you mentioned I have pretty much tried all (Ashwaghanda, Rohdiola, Omega-3 and NAC) and the first 3 cure my P.E. but give me anger and headaches...

As far as Thyroid, here are my numbers:
TSH 2.58 (Range 0.45-4.5)
Pregnenolone  97
T4 = 1.39 (range 0.82-1.77)
Reverse T3 14.3 (range 9.2- 24.1)

So my thyroid is in check.

Those numbers look good, but have you had a free T3 number pulled?  It's probably fine, but it's also the most important thyroid number you can get.

I don't have Free T3 on Blood Plasma but I do have it from my 24 hour urine test:
649 (300-1100)

Your post has really made me think though, if lowering Cortisol increases Norepenephrine then that's exactly my problem... I try to lower Cortisol and my Norepenephrine shoots up! That's pretty abnormal.

Kierkegaard

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Re: Excess DHT and P.E.
« Reply #10 on: October 27, 2015, 01:35:29 am »
PE is often driven by excess norepinephrine.  How's your thyroid?

My thyroid is okay as far as tests but you are right on as far as excess norepinephrine,
I have the COMT+ gene and it causes excess norepinephrine,
Any suggestions on how I can lower it?
I use magnesium at night which has been great to promote sleep but has not done anything for PE

Oh wow, I didn't even think of that connection!  I'll be looking into genetic testing. 

As for lowering norepinephrine, it's hard to find good substances, but from what I can tell l-theanine and rhodiola are known to lower norepinephrine.  I'm taking an adrenal supplement called "Adrenal Health" by Gaia, and it's been the only supplement that has made my erections and libido better, indicating lowered NE (it has rhodiola and ashwagandha). 

http://www.lifeextension.com/magazine/2011/3/the-chemistry-of-calm/Page-01

The above link has inositol, omega-3s, and n-acecyl-cysteine (NAC) as other supplements.  I'm currently thinking my problems are caused by excess norepinephrine (though I don't have PE, except every now and then).  Theoretically, if you have lower than optimal cortisol, this would mean higher norepinephrine, given that cortisol is what lowers the stress response (including NE, which is what starts it via the locus coeruleus in the brain stem).

The reason I mentioned thyroid is that hypothyroidism involves elevated levels of norepinphrine (lots of people, including doctors, don't know this).  Do you have your thyroid numbers?  I think shooting for the upper fourth of the range for free T3 is the way to go, so there's usually room for improvement in most people.  Gaia makes another supplement for thyroid that I'll be asking my doc about in a few days, so that might be enough to give it a bump. 

ETA: how's your sleep and stress level, btw?  Any chance you get brain fog?

Wow, I had no idea there is a correlation between Cortisol and Norepenephrine.... I have high Cortisol too, no wonder
when I take P.S. to lower Cortisol I get really bad headaches and anger..... It's probably jacking up my Norepenephrine...
This is been a real problem for me... I wish there was a supplement that would lower each one without effecting the other.

Out of the supplements that you mentioned I have pretty much tried all (Ashwaghanda, Rohdiola, Omega-3 and NAC) and the first 3 cure my P.E. but give me anger and headaches...

As far as Thyroid, here are my numbers:
TSH 2.58 (Range 0.45-4.5)
Pregnenolone  97
T4 = 1.39 (range 0.82-1.77)
Reverse T3 14.3 (range 9.2- 24.1)

So my thyroid is in check.

Those numbers look good, but have you had a free T3 number pulled?  It's probably fine, but it's also the most important thyroid number you can get.

I don't have Free T3 on Blood Plasma but I do have it from my 24 hour urine test:
649 (300-1100)

Your post has really made me think though, if lowering Cortisol increases Norepenephrine then that's exactly my problem... I try to lower Cortisol and my Norepenephrine shoots up! That's pretty abnormal.

I don't have experience with urinary free T3, but if that translates smoothly to serum levels, that's just barely below the middle.  I think it would be worth it to get a blood level pulled, and if it's below 3.3 pg/ml or so you should try and find a doc to put you on a trial of Armour or T3/T4, or give a good thyroid glandular or supplement a shot.

If you have less cortisol to reign in norepinephrine, then this means that for each burst of norepinephrine, NE shouldn't be higher than if you had higher cortisol, but it should decrease at a slower rate.  Which means that with multiple stressors (i.e., real life), your NE will pile up faster with lower cortisol than higher cortisol.  Dr. Mariano talks about a positive feedback loop with NE:

"Norepinephrine increases adrenal hormone production by stimulating the release of Corticotropin Releasing Hormone (CRH) from the hypothalamus. CRH then increases Adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) release from the pituitary. ACTH then travels to the adrenal glands to stimulate steroid hormone production - the primary one being Cortisol.

Norepinephrine also triggers a signal that goes through the sympathetic nervous system nerves which travel parallel to the spine. These nerves then trigger the production of Norepinephrine and Epinephrine from the center of the Adrenal Gland. The adrenal gland, itself, is an enlarged ganglion of the sympathetic nervous system.

What is interesting about CRH is that it travels not only to the pituitary to stimulate ACTH production, but it also travels to the rest of the brain, where it stimulates Norepinephrine release.

CRH thus participates in a positive feedback loop - where increased Norepinephrine results in increased CRH - which then increases Norepinephrine release. If this positive feedback loop is not stopped, the stress signal is magnified repeatedly. If not curtailed, this stress signal snowballs and causes panic attacks. If it is stopped, then the stress signal is stopped."

He goes on to say that it's cortisol that stops this positive feedback loop, because cortisol loops back up to the hypothalamus and tells it to put the breaks on CRH.  I wouldn't recommend *increasing* cortisol without a doctor's supervision, but it would be worth considering to get a 4x salivary cortisol test and see where your levels are at. 
« Last Edit: October 27, 2015, 01:37:02 am by Kierkegaard »
"The same thing that makes you live can kill you in the end." -- Neil Young

March 2014: Dx low T (158ng/dl)
September 2015: Dx hypothyroidism, other adrenal hypofunction
2016: chronic fatigue, unspecified

Depression and anxiety guide: http://www.peaktestosterone.com/Help_Anxiety_Depression

PeakT

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Re: Excess DHT and P.E.
« Reply #11 on: October 27, 2015, 02:25:53 am »


I spent a couple of years trying to figure out the MTHRF test results and spent a couple of thousand dollars with 3 different doctors and finally came to the conclusion that although they have some answers such as why something is wrong, they are yet to find solutions that fixes them without causing other side effects... so I let it go for now

Here is what you don't want to ignore:  high homocysteine from MTHFR or any other reason.  This will likely lower nitric oxide and lead to heart disease:

http://www.peaktestosterone.com/Erectile_Dysfunction_High_Homocysteine

MTHFR can cause a host of issues and, like you said, they are just getting their arms around treatment for methylation issues.  But I do know you don't want high homocysteine.  So pull that.  Imo every man should do that fairly regularly.  It's a pretty cheap test anyway.
THE MOST COMPREHENSIVE BOOK ON TRT/TESTOSTERONE:
https://www.amazon.com/Natural-Versus-Testosterone-Therapy-Myer/dp/1523210532/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1499116128&sr=8-1&keywords=natural+versus+testosterone+therapy
And check out my New Peak Testosterone Program: http://www.peaktestosterone.com/peak_testosterone_program
If you are on medications or have a medical condition, always check with your doctor first before making any lifestyle changes or taking new supplements.  And low testosterone is a medical condition.

Peyt

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Re: Excess DHT and P.E.
« Reply #12 on: October 27, 2015, 02:40:23 am »
PE is often driven by excess norepinephrine.  How's your thyroid?

My thyroid is okay as far as tests but you are right on as far as excess norepinephrine,
I have the COMT+ gene and it causes excess norepinephrine,
Any suggestions on how I can lower it?
I use magnesium at night which has been great to promote sleep but has not done anything for PE

Oh wow, I didn't even think of that connection!  I'll be looking into genetic testing. 

As for lowering norepinephrine, it's hard to find good substances, but from what I can tell l-theanine and rhodiola are known to lower norepinephrine.  I'm taking an adrenal supplement called "Adrenal Health" by Gaia, and it's been the only supplement that has made my erections and libido better, indicating lowered NE (it has rhodiola and ashwagandha). 

http://www.lifeextension.com/magazine/2011/3/the-chemistry-of-calm/Page-01

The above link has inositol, omega-3s, and n-acecyl-cysteine (NAC) as other supplements.  I'm currently thinking my problems are caused by excess norepinephrine (though I don't have PE, except every now and then).  Theoretically, if you have lower than optimal cortisol, this would mean higher norepinephrine, given that cortisol is what lowers the stress response (including NE, which is what starts it via the locus coeruleus in the brain stem).

The reason I mentioned thyroid is that hypothyroidism involves elevated levels of norepinphrine (lots of people, including doctors, don't know this).  Do you have your thyroid numbers?  I think shooting for the upper fourth of the range for free T3 is the way to go, so there's usually room for improvement in most people.  Gaia makes another supplement for thyroid that I'll be asking my doc about in a few days, so that might be enough to give it a bump. 

ETA: how's your sleep and stress level, btw?  Any chance you get brain fog?

Wow, I had no idea there is a correlation between Cortisol and Norepenephrine.... I have high Cortisol too, no wonder
when I take P.S. to lower Cortisol I get really bad headaches and anger..... It's probably jacking up my Norepenephrine...
This is been a real problem for me... I wish there was a supplement that would lower each one without effecting the other.

Out of the supplements that you mentioned I have pretty much tried all (Ashwaghanda, Rohdiola, Omega-3 and NAC) and the first 3 cure my P.E. but give me anger and headaches...

As far as Thyroid, here are my numbers:
TSH 2.58 (Range 0.45-4.5)
Pregnenolone  97
T4 = 1.39 (range 0.82-1.77)
Reverse T3 14.3 (range 9.2- 24.1)

So my thyroid is in check.

Those numbers look good, but have you had a free T3 number pulled?  It's probably fine, but it's also the most important thyroid number you can get.

I don't have Free T3 on Blood Plasma but I do have it from my 24 hour urine test:
649 (300-1100)

Your post has really made me think though, if lowering Cortisol increases Norepenephrine then that's exactly my problem... I try to lower Cortisol and my Norepenephrine shoots up! That's pretty abnormal.

I don't have experience with urinary free T3, but if that translates smoothly to serum levels, that's just barely below the middle.  I think it would be worth it to get a blood level pulled, and if it's below 3.3 pg/ml or so you should try and find a doc to put you on a trial of Armour or T3/T4, or give a good thyroid glandular or supplement a shot.

If you have less cortisol to reign in norepinephrine, then this means that for each burst of norepinephrine, NE shouldn't be higher than if you had higher cortisol, but it should decrease at a slower rate.  Which means that with multiple stressors (i.e., real life), your NE will pile up faster with lower cortisol than higher cortisol.  Dr. Mariano talks about a positive feedback loop with NE:

"Norepinephrine increases adrenal hormone production by stimulating the release of Corticotropin Releasing Hormone (CRH) from the hypothalamus. CRH then increases Adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) release from the pituitary. ACTH then travels to the adrenal glands to stimulate steroid hormone production - the primary one being Cortisol.

Norepinephrine also triggers a signal that goes through the sympathetic nervous system nerves which travel parallel to the spine. These nerves then trigger the production of Norepinephrine and Epinephrine from the center of the Adrenal Gland. The adrenal gland, itself, is an enlarged ganglion of the sympathetic nervous system.

What is interesting about CRH is that it travels not only to the pituitary to stimulate ACTH production, but it also travels to the rest of the brain, where it stimulates Norepinephrine release.

CRH thus participates in a positive feedback loop - where increased Norepinephrine results in increased CRH - which then increases Norepinephrine release. If this positive feedback loop is not stopped, the stress signal is magnified repeatedly. If not curtailed, this stress signal snowballs and causes panic attacks. If it is stopped, then the stress signal is stopped."

He goes on to say that it's cortisol that stops this positive feedback loop, because cortisol loops back up to the hypothalamus and tells it to put the breaks on CRH.  I wouldn't recommend *increasing* cortisol without a doctor's supervision, but it would be worth considering to get a 4x salivary cortisol test and see where your levels are at.

Funny you should say that, I actually did get a 4x salivary cortisol test
It showed higher than normal in the morning , Very high at noon, then crashed at night and even lower at midnight.
I was just listening to a radio show which was talking about Cortisol and NE, and the Dr. was saying in some patients it may be that the relationship between Cortisol and NE needs to be managed, for example in my case I would think I need to lower my cortisol in the morning but later in the afternoon when it starts to crash I need to up it a little ... I sure wish there was a supplement that could pull the swings in a little and not have high and low crashes (in my case) 

Peyt

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Re: Excess DHT and P.E.
« Reply #13 on: October 27, 2015, 02:41:29 am »


I spent a couple of years trying to figure out the MTHRF test results and spent a couple of thousand dollars with 3 different doctors and finally came to the conclusion that although they have some answers such as why something is wrong, they are yet to find solutions that fixes them without causing other side effects... so I let it go for now

Here is what you don't want to ignore:  high homocysteine from MTHFR or any other reason.  This will likely lower nitric oxide and lead to heart disease:

http://www.peaktestosterone.com/Erectile_Dysfunction_High_Homocysteine

MTHFR can cause a host of issues and, like you said, they are just getting their arms around treatment for methylation issues.  But I do know you don't want high homocysteine.  So pull that.  Imo every man should do that fairly regularly.  It's a pretty cheap test anyway.

This is great info, but honestly I don't have ED my problem is PE so I think it may be different mechanism.

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Re: Excess DHT and P.E.
« Reply #14 on: October 27, 2015, 02:44:03 am »


I spent a couple of years trying to figure out the MTHRF test results and spent a couple of thousand dollars with 3 different doctors and finally came to the conclusion that although they have some answers such as why something is wrong, they are yet to find solutions that fixes them without causing other side effects... so I let it go for now

Here is what you don't want to ignore:  high homocysteine from MTHFR or any other reason.  This will likely lower nitric oxide and lead to heart disease:

http://www.peaktestosterone.com/Erectile_Dysfunction_High_Homocysteine

MTHFR can cause a host of issues and, like you said, they are just getting their arms around treatment for methylation issues.  But I do know you don't want high homocysteine.  So pull that.  Imo every man should do that fairly regularly.  It's a pretty cheap test anyway.

This is great info, but honestly I don't have ED my problem is PE so I think it may be different mechanism.

High NE can manifest in multiple ways.  When your stress response is up, your body turns down "rest and digest" behaviors, leading to ED in some men.  In others it can be PE, but in most elevated NE probably doesn't show up with any symptoms, so long as it isn't elevated too much.  NE elevated slightly in isolation probably doesn't do anything, but when NE is elevated too much it depletes dopamine and raises cortisol, so the relationship between variables could be more important here than isolated elevations. 
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Re: Excess DHT and P.E.
« Reply #14 on: October 27, 2015, 02:44:03 am »